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PowerChucker

Advice On Dogs

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My girlfriend just bought a 6 week old Pug, Dammm is he cute! his name is Otis.

anyway neither of us has much expierence raising a puppy. so I was wondering if anyone has any tips to make raising him a little easier?

Thanks.

Adam

PowerChuck.

 

I'm going to her house now, so i'll reply later this weekend(she doesn't have a pc) :(

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The best thing to do is get a crate to keep him in, get it large enough so that when he'a full grown he'll fit in it. Put him in the cratee every night with some news paper on the bottom. The first several nights he'll cry most of the night. The crate makes it vert easy to house break cuz he'll learn to hold to go out side(won't like going in his crate). After a couple of weeks it'll be hard to keep him out of going into the crate,Mine love's to stay/sleep in her's.There's way to much for anybody to tell ya here. I highly recommend sevreal good books and find a dog trainer in your area to train you how to handle your dog. You'll both be much happier and so will your dog

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I know a cage sounds cruel but ask any trainer,breeder it's the best thing. That cute little pup is going to be a full grown dog before ya know it

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Guest Donna

W have shepard/huskey cross. He's never been in a cage. never peed on the floor either. He lives in the house with us. He sleeps on the floor on my side of the bed has a pillow and a blanket.

 

With a dog all you have to make sure is, He has to know you (people) are the boss. And love him lots. Teach it like you would a child, be consistant.

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Sure you can raise a dog without a cage, it's just eaiser to house break and transport,there are other sitatuations when a cage come's in handy...The dog's really like the security. Like I said mine goe's in her's just to sleep,the door stay's open. At first they hate it , My newf was a pup she had her cage facing end up and she was outside of it (never figgured how she did that) It only took 'bout two weeks before liked staying in it

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Joe C we actually used to call em crates(cage sounds a little harsh). It not like your imprisioning the dog, it's more like a doghouse thats inside the house. Ive raised alot of dogs using crates, doesn't do em a bit of harm.

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Listen to Joe C. I never used a crate either but I know it works well, and dogs like a smaller area for sleeping and resting. It just gets him or her in the habit of holding it just a second in the morning. The important thing is to be considerate and not make him wait. Dogs are just wonderful. You will have such fun and pugs are good little dogs. He'll try hard to make you happy. A crate just makes it easier for him not to mess up because they don't like to go where they sleep. :P

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We used a crate with all of our dogs in the past too, except for the dog we have now, we got lucky she trained herself. But she still used one to sleep in, just because she liked it.

It does work well. Most dogs will learn to love their crate (after the first few days when they're unsure) because it's their private place. They'll start going in it when they want to be alone and to sleep.

Puppies have an instinctal urge to be in a small cozy space. A large open house is terrifing to a tiny puppy. Think of how it was when the puppy was with it's mother(during sleep not active play)- In a small area, like a box or corner, snuggled against it mother and siblings. Try to imitate that feeling with the crate.

Have the puppy sleep in the crate at night. If the crate is large, divide it with a piece of wood or something, so it's just big enough for the puppy to stand up and turn around, you can remove the wood as the puppy grows and won't need that cozy feeling as much anyway. If you have a ticking alarm clock, put it near the cage, or even inside an old sock, in the cage. This will represent mother and siblings heartbeats. Another thing is warmth that he had from the other dogs, get a empty 16 0z pop bottle fill it with warm water and stick it an old sock, in the cage.

I had a lot of dogs, and trust me, they may sound silly, but it makes a huge difference! The puppy will will feel more like it did at it's first home with it's mama.

 

Just be sure she doesn't give in to any cries and put the puppy in her bed, that's starting something that will be awfully hard to break.

 

The puppy will be able to sleep all night without having to go out, but not at first! And he wiil cry for other reasons when first starting in the cage, but once he start sleeping some and then wakes up crying, be sure to take him out- even if you don't think he needs it. Puppies can't "hold it" for very long, but more importantly, you want him to learn crying means- I have to go out.

 

:) oh yes, Lux said the most important- love him alot! :)

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I agree with others...a crate is a good idea. Thats what I used on my dog (labrador). It teaches the the dog discipline, how to wait to go to the bathroom and how to get used to being confined/alone when you are not in the house.

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A few tips from London...Most Important, love 'em lots...and never, ever hit a dog. Always make sure they walk through your front door..LAST!! always feed your dog AFTER you have eaten, never feed your dog from the table and don't be tempted to share a snack with him. Always praise him lots when he gets something right and don't shout when he gets things wrong (a dog will see that as attention too!) just ignore him. What you are trying to achieve is to integrate your dog into "your pack" and let him know you are the "alpha"...not him!!!. Once he knows the "pecking order" he will feel secure. Out of control dogs are the fault of the owner. A well trained dog is a joy to live with, a dog that is not trained is a burden. ;)

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A few months ago, we picked up an eight-year-old Rhodesian ridge-back/Hungarian Viszla cross. She's been nothing but a a pain-in-the-:filtered: matched with a darling and sweetheart temprement. I think we'll keep her.

 

I

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I used to train dogs back a few years and something that sticks out is an older trainer telling me that in order to train dogs it helps it your smarter than the dog. :lol::lol:

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Donna, thats what we had!! A shep/husky mix names OTIS!! He was the best dog in the world. We didn't crate him either and he was house trained. Was so protective but gentle with the kids. He died 2 years ago, cancer. We all miss him so much still, we haven't brought ourselves to get another dog yet.

chuck, make sure you get vaccines for your pup. Parvo, especially, the every 4 weeks, the last one at 17 weeks old. Make sure this spring he is put on heartworm prevetative too. You got real good advise here otherwise. I worked for a vet for 12 years, it real important to get those shots. Good luck with your "baby". :)

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I just love puppies. They are the unconditional love that no one or nothing can replace. :)

 

Crate=good idea/ Feed good food - not junk (ie: Iams, Eukanuba, or Science Diet dry for small breeds) Dry is better for their teeth moisten w/warm water and add a teaspoon of canned / Please don't forget the shots right on schedule/ Pugs are a wonderful breed but the breed does have problems with eyes and the sinus (nose). Use a jell on his wrinkles on his nose (ie K-Y jell)/ And what everyone said: a well trained dog is up to you - obedience school is a great way to learn how to handle a puppy and it's fun (at least my classes were)/ do not hit the dog especially a pug/ don't let a puppy bite or teach it to growl or bite/ Always have alot of toys and the hard bones they sell in the pet stores - do not use the chew rubber things or pigs ear - not good for their tummy/ Remember that he/she is a toy breed/ Be very careful about their chewing cords, slippers, or clothes/ and babies like to sleep

 

Have a wonderful time with the puppy and give him/her lots of love. :)

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A couple of things about chastisement. If you must chastise a dog - and occasionally it is necessary - do be sure to make amends within a couple of minutes of doing so and give him a pat. Don't string anything out. If you do, the animal could develop personality problems. Short and sharp is the answer. Also, don't attempt to administer any form of admonishment, raising the voice or otherwise, if too much time has elapsed in between. Unless he is remonstrated with immediately, the dog will be bewildered as he will not be capable of connecting the events.

That said, dogs are very forgiving. They don't hold grudges.

d0nut

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You Guys Rock!! :rocks: I knew i could count on some quality advice here!

Thank you all for the advice, there are a few bad habbits that he (Otis) will have to break, but for a 6 week old puppy he is doing ok! I'm deffinitly getting a crate! he cries until we put him in the bed. Also i'm trying to get him to bite and chew his toys instead of my face and fingers and every shoe or slipper in site! He cut my lip open last night! Any way, Thank You for the help

Volt, thanks for the link!

Adam

powerchuck music

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He'll probably scream (cry) all night for the first few nights, Don't give in....let him cry, do what farmgirl stated with some things to remind him of "mom"

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