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Kerr Avon

What hard drive partitions can I delete, so I can resize or add a new

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I have bought a HP DM1 (Windows 7, 32GB hard drive, 4GB RAM), and I want to partition the C: (Windows) drive into two;
- one partition containing only Windows 7 and other Windows programs,
- the second partition containing games and data.
The reason for this is that I can then create an image of the fully working C: drive (containing only Windows and related programs), so that if (when) Windows 7 needs reinstalling in the future, I can just copy the image back over the C: drive, restoring the laptop to it's working state. I can do that even if there's only one partition, of course, but the image will be huge, so I' rather have two partitions, and only create an image of the first partition. Plus if there are two partitions, then the second partition will survive my 'rolling back' the laptop (when I put the image back onto the C: drive) so I won't lose anything I've put onto the second partition in the meantime.
So I was going to resize the current C: drive (which is 275GB) without losing the data (I've done this before, the software handles the data organisation automatically) into two partitions, but the problem is, the laptop's hard drive already has four partition, and aparently it's not possible to put another partiton on there. Is this correct, and if so, can I resize one of the existing partitions (say E:, the 22GB partition, and shrink the C: partition by a corresponding amount) and use that partition for my games and data? And if so, will the built in recovery software still work (I probably won't ever need it, as the C: drive image will be enough, but it would be nice to have the option)? If I don't need the built in recovery (if an image of the working C: drive is enough) then can I delete all of the software on E:, and resize E (reducing the 275GB partition) and use E: as my data partition?
Or is it possible to restructure the drive to give me two partitions I can use, as well as the three that already exist for the system?
The current (default, I've not altered them) paritions are shown in Acronis
Home Image as
C: pri, act 199MB
D: pri 275.8GB
E: pri 22 GB
F: pri 103 MB
Is it safe to delete F: (in which case I'd then have three partitions, allowing me to change the 275GB partition to two partiitons)? Or can I Also, how does Windows see the 275GB drive as C:, when Acronis (which I boot into via USB stick) sees it as D: ?
Thanks for any answers.

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Judging from the fact you say it's an HP, they likely have a "factory restore partition" on there, could be "C" or "F". You will want to save it. Windows 7 also creates a 100Mb partition for it's "restore" service (not visible in My Computer). Gotta have that too...

 

I use Easeus Partition Master Home to re-size all my partitions. > http://download.cnet.com/EaseUS-Partition-Master-Free-Edition/3000-2248_4-10863346.html

Judging from your layout, I'm guessing that "C" and "F" have nothing on them so this is what I'd do and I think it will accomplish what you want:

C: 50 Gb Windows

D: 122 Gb Games, etc.

E: 122 Gb or remainder for storage

F: 3 Gb for the HP restore partition

Or something close to all that...

How to Use Easeus Partition Master > http://www.wikihow.com/Change-a-Partition-Size-Using-Easeus-Partition-Manager should be the same for Win 7

 

Also, don't depend on Windows Backup and Recovery software to restore your PC, use something like Macrium Reflect > Macrium Reflect...I use it on all my PC's and it has saved me 3 times. Just create the recovery media that's recommended and schedule it to backup weekly. (you'll have to trim down the amount of backups or they'll amount to a sizable #).

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

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You should back up your pc . Using an external drive is one method to make a complete image of your hard drive, some software will back up to DVD-RW disks too. Personally, my router has USB ports and I have a JBOD external drive caddy that has a two hard drive drive capacity, total of 4 tb's which is two 2 tb drives. I have a software program that will create an image of all our pc's weekly at a prescribed time. I like this because I can set it and forget it

 

It's a cheap way of making a like NAS device without all the extra cost

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182144

 

 

 

Not if, but when your hard drive pukes on you, you'll have a complete image of the drive with all your games that should not be more than a week old. Just pop in a fresh hard drive and re-install your backed up image

 

 

 

 

 

.

Edited by Joe C

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C: pri, act 199MB
D: pri 275.8GB
E: pri 22 GB
F: pri 103 MB

 

if you do decide you want to add partitions later, you'd need to deleted D: and create a logical partition in the space not a primary one. then you'd be able to add any new partitions on that new logical one, of course that would mean installing the os again along with any data and programs.

 

C: is where the boot loader is. (199MB very small partition.)

D: is where the os and all programs and data are. (275.8GB most of what looks like a 300GB hard drive installed in that machine.)

E: is probably your restore partition and the one to leave alone always. (22GB about what new machines use now for the os and all the junk manufacturers install.)

F: is a partition i believe windows creates for eufi use, but not 100% sure why it creates it. (103 MB very small partition.)

 

 

FWIT, I've decided I'll probably keep things the way they are, rather than risk messing anything up.

must admit, i think you've made the best choice in leaving everything as it is. it's very easy to break things so nothing boots and can be quite hard to fix it again if you don't know exactly what your doing.

 

:b33r:

Edited by terry1966

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The Dell System Restore partition easier to break than you might realize:

 

The Dell-specific Ctrl+F11 process is supposed to completely automate the restoration process, returning the hard disk to the state it was in when Dell shipped the computer. However, overwriting the MBR by using a boot manager, using the commands "fixmbr" or "fdisk /mbr", installing from a Windows installation CD, and assorted other tasks a user might do will inadvertantly break Ctrl+F11, rendering the system unable to boot the DSR partition. Furthermore, changing the partitioning by adding, deleting, or resizing partitions will cause DSRcheck to fail, so even if Ctrl+F11 works, the restore process will abort without attempting to restore the Ghost image.

This article explains the Dell DSR partition fairly well

http://www.goodells.net/dellrestore/fixes.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

.

Edited by Joe C

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The Dell System Restore partition easier to break than you might realize:

yep, :tup:

 

well not the restore partition itself just how it is usually accessed.

 

all the info needed is stored on that partition including mbr files that can be used to repair things, which would include getting the usual access method of F11 button to work again.

so as long as you never delete the restore partition, it can ALWAYS be used to restore your pc to an as new condition even if you accidentally break things so the F11 button no longer works to start the restore/reinstall process.

 

it's just a case of knowing what your doing. ;)

or in my case trial and error. :rofl3:

 

that's why i never ever delete it on any pc i work on or advise anyone else to delete their restore partition either.

do not delete it even if you think it no longer works because the F11 or whatever key does nothing any more.

do not delete it even if you have an install disc to use to install an os with.

it probably still does work, unless there's been a hard drive failure and/or the data on it has been corrupted, so is always worth keeping.

 

i've fixed at least 2 machines where people thought their restore partition was no longer usable, once was a simple case of just making that partition the boot partition so it automatically started the restore process on restart, another time it took a lot of trial and error with mbr file choices and partition setups but i got it working again like new in the end, even tho it did take me 2 days where an expert could have fixed it in 1/2 an hour flat. :rofl3:

 

so in my opinion that partition has always been important but it becomes even more important today seeing how new pc's no longer have their windows os key sticker on them.

 

:b33r:

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