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KurtBleach

Locked out

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Hello, all.

I also find myself locked out of SUSE. I'm trying to get back into Linux Land, but since I now have a PC for the first time since 2007, please try to forgive me for total n00bage. :)

Here's the situation: I'm trying to install openSUSE 12.1 on my PC from an ISO disk I seem to have successfully burned (ran checksum on d/l, verified "no errors" through SUSE installer). Sadly, since I didn't have some of the answers for certain prompts, all I did was fry my Windows. (I know, maybe no great loss, but sucks for now with no PC at all).

Here's the questions:

1. My PC is not directly connected to the internet (Verizon FIOS), I have a zyXEL wireless USB gadget. Do I choose it or my eth0 card for my connection? If I choose the wireless, it says the kernel does not recognize my card, but maybe it's because I didn't enter the right info, which leads to question...

 

2. What on Earth are an ESSID and a WPA key? I know my xyXEL device was called PQBTL before I whacked Windows, and there is another 16-character alphanumeric code. Could these be it (and is the 16-character one hex or passphrase)?

 

3. I know what was my IP address for my PC and its gateway, but I am clueless as to what to enter when prompted for a) "enter your search domains separated by spaces", and B) "enter the IP address of the HTTP server". Sometimes it comes up automatically as downloads.opensuse.org, but if I press OK it says "invalid input". Does anyone know the correct IP I should enter? Then, is the correct directory "/distribution/12.1/repo/oss/"?

 

OK, I apologize for being so needy, but it has been five years. Linux people rock - I'm sure there's someone here who can help me get my SUSE on and start flying my Penguin flag again.

 

Thanks.

Peace.

 

P.S. That smiley with the shades on came up when I tried to type b parenthesis. Man, I am lost. :mrgreen:

Edited by KurtBleach

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Bruce or Terry can help you best but...

 

1. eth0 would be your ethernet (wired) connection, not the USB gadget. You should have no issues if you plug in a cat5 cable before installation. Sometimes wireless adapters are not recognized and thus cannot be used during installation. It should not be necessary to be connected to the Internet for install unless you are using the network installation (bare minimum) disc. However, a quick google shows that you may have an issue with the USB wireless adapter. There are ways around this, such as using ndiswrapper to use a windows driver on linux, but you would need to know the exact model of the adapter. lsusb or lspci should reveal this information from the terminal.

 

2. ESSID is going to be the name of your wireless network and WPA key is a type of security for said network. Generally a user sets this up on their own, but I have seen many FiOS routers come with this information printed on the side of the modem/router box. You won't even be able to input this information, however, if the wireless adapter is not being recognized (there is no driver included in the kernel). Not sure about the other stuff, looks to be information about repositories/mirrors for updates or something.

 

3. The Gateway is your router, which is commonly 192.168.1.1 though it may differ. Your computer's local IP address would be some remnant of this (192.168.1.2 for example). This number does not necessarily apply to your SuSE installation because if you do not have a static IP address, the address may change depending on which devices are connected, etc.

 

Which version of SuSE are you trying to install? 32 bit or 64 bit? DVD, CD, or network installation disc? How did you screw windows up...incorrect partitioning?

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I'm trying to install openSUSE 12.1 via network from an ISO disk (32-bit, i586). I don't know how Windows got wasted because I never got to YaST or GRUB, it just died.

 

The kernel seems to recognize my ethernet card, but I don't know the info to fill in under "enter your search domains" and "enter IP address of HTTP server".

Edited by KurtBleach

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The network install is the bare bones one which is very small and fits on a CD. It requires you to download packages from the internet to complete the installation. If possible, use the regular DVD first and see if it includes software to properly recogniz your connectivity devices.

 

Windows can only be wasted if you got to the partition editor. That is the only way.

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If you are using the ethernet card you should not have to enter any information all, it should just work.

 

If you have a wireless dongle, remove it for the installation and after everything is installed then you can worry about wireless setup.

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just a thought, but has you're hard drive failed and it's trying to do a network boot from the bios? or is it actually booting a suse network cd?

 

don't think i've ever done a network install, so no idea what menu's you should get(or if it's any different than using a live cd), but if your having no luck and can only burn cd's the route i'd go is to burn a suse kde live cd, boot that, see if you can get onto the internet, if so you know your network hardware has drivers and is working, so then choose to do an install with it.

 

:b33r:

Edited by terry1966

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Actually Terry a net install works exactly the same as a DVD install unless you are using a wireless card with a router that uses encryption. So if you don't know your routers settings then a network install would be a bit difficult.

 

However if using a wired connection then there is nothing different about the installation process, it behaves exactly the same as a DVD install would.

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Thank you all for your replies.

 

adam22: I honestly never made it to the partitioning part. However, when I ran the firmware test on the SUSE disc, it showed 2 fails - HPET config failed, and BIOS does not support EDD. I'm certainly light-years away from geekhood, but could I be correct to assume that these faults caused the SUSE disc to overwrite my Windows partition?

 

Bruce: My PC now is not a tower PC (and here I must again express my gratitude for the time you were so gracious as to call me at my old residence and talk me through installing more RAM and, I think, a sound card). This PC is a COMPAQ Evo, it's a little thing smaller than a VCR. I'm not even sure I have an ethernet card. The network connection options the SUSE disc gives me are as follows - eth0: Intel 82801DB PRO/100 VM (LOM) Ethernet Controller, and wlan0: ZyXEL G-220 (the dongle - funny word).

 

Here's the deal. My PC is not at all directly cabled to the router. I won't go into the boring details (I'll just quote Cheech and Chong and say things are tough all over), but I had to move out of my old crib and now just rent a room. The router is in the dining room of the house (ESSID and WPA2 key are indeed on the side of it - thanks, Adam) and the only cable to my room goes to the set-top box connected to my TV. Evidently the dongle receives from the router and sends to the ethernet controller, which is how I was able to go online. The PC was a gift from my brother, who once he found out I was getting FIOS came to my place (ha freakin ha) and set the whole thing up, since I was at work at the time. So, obviously, I have no clue of why it's set up like this.

 

So, to sum it all up, my Penguin amigos - if the kernel cannot recognize my wireless connection, I have no choice but to donate 200-some dollars to Mr. Gates at his beautiful mansion in Redmond (since both Best Buy and Staples only carry Windows 7), unless I can luck into some local mom-and-pop place or local lone wolf computer person who can actually sell me the real physical SUSE installation discs. Somewhere in the original thread where I first posted (I can't find it) someone posted that if I actually had SUSE installed there's a command that I could use to load the ZYXEL driver and get connected.

 

OK, that's it, thanks again to all. I tried to come back to Linux, but I guess it just ain't happening.

 

Peace.

 

P.S. @ adam22 - Open your mind? New Jersey? You wouldn't happen to be a DJ at TSR, would you?

Edited by KurtBleach

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LOL not to my knowledge. It's just a little saying the linux folks would understand. Are you from New Jersey?

 

I sent you a PM

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until you can install suse, have you tried doing a factory restore to see if you can get your windows os back up and running? think it's tapping F10 key on boot takes you to those options.

 

:b33r:

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Terry, that only opens up BIOS, and I find no options for a factory restore.

OK, all - this will be my final question in this thread. I notice a pair of open USB slots on the router.

 

Q: Would it be possible for me to purchase a long enough male/male USB cable (say 15 to 20 ft.) to directly connect my PC to the router (thereby skipping the dongle), or should I just step away from the pipe and save some of the crack money for buying my new Windows 7?

 

 

 

 

No crack was smoked during the creation of this post. It's just a sort of nod to the fact that there's a fellow Jerseyan in this thread who knows that "step away from the crack pipe" means "stop being a total idiot".

 

:b33r:

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Clearly marked - USB 1, USB 2. Stuck a USB cord in, fit perfectly. I'm just wondering if anyone makes a cord long enough to reach my PC's USB slot, and if it would even work anyway. I just want to be able to connect to the net to d/l the necessary SUSE stuff to install it.

I can worry about getting the dongle's Win driver to work in Linux later.

 

Router brand/model is Actiontec MI424WR. Provider is Verizon FIOS.

 

I can't sneak onto the landlady's PC late at night forever. I either have to find a way to solve this SUSE/connection impasse, or it's "hello Redmond" time.

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i believe those usb ports are usually for network printers or hard drives, like adam i've never seen a router with them so have no past experience, but to be honest i don't see why you couldn't connect a pc to them.

 

:b33r:

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My router has usb ports, they are not for connecting computers, they are for usb hard drives and or printers.

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Routers have an operating system on them. They are limited to by memory, and storage capacity the number of drivers and functionality. So the manufacturers designate what the ports can and can not do.

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Yes certain routers you can. They however require a driver just like a usb dongle does. It isn't a simple matter of plugging it in and having it work like ethernet would. Of course I can't imagine why anyone would choose Unreliable Silly Bus over Ethernet anyways.

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even if you could get drivers in linux to connect to the router via usb, i think the max cable length is 3 metres so that is way to short for what he needs anyway.

 

:b33r:

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Terry: Thanks for the answer I needed. I know I'm just a bleedin' Yank, but even I know that 3 meters is somewhere between 9 and 10 feet - so unless I hire a team of bulldozers to drive my room 3m closer to the router... :b33r:

 

Bruce: I didn't get a choice on the USB vs. Ethernet thing - I got it for free. Free is good.

Maybe it's karma. Something I've said or done has made me unworthy of the gift of a PC, so now karma has decreed that I must pay in full for Windows 7 to appease it. (Hell! Has Gates bought out and swallowed up karmatoo?)

 

Adam: Thanks for your help and PMs. (Wesley Willis impression - "Rock over London, rock on NEW JERSEY!")

But without giving out which towns we reside in - it's just too far for me. There's servers at the restaurant I work at who are younger than my truck.

 

So I'm peacing out, people. Mods, do what ye will with this thread. Delete it, or just lock it and save for future Linux hopefuls to perhaps learn from the error of my ways - but keep my Pit account active. Of course I'll get Win7 running straight out of the box, but I'll be sure to return to the Pit for expect advice on tweaks to subvert Big Brother Redmond's intrusive ways, and gain at least some control over how it runs.

 

Peace out. :adios:

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Would be willing to make the short drive over Kurt. I've got the necessary Windows and Linux discs to get things goings for you.

 

Good luck either way.

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