Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
8210GUY

Want To Minimise The Risk Of Losing Files ?

Recommended Posts

This works in both Windows 7 and Vista, the idea is simple, after working on a mates system where his raid failed, he had files that were essential (yeah we all know you should back up), but whether raid or single drive, if you have files in you're My Documents, My Music etc that you don't want to risk losing, then simply move these folders to a slave drive (needless to say you need 2 drives here), then if the worst happens, you do not have to worry about getting these files back, they are already safe on the slave drive, all work is automatically saved to the new location, NOT the OS drive, so if a reinstall is required, you're files are safe, this is not a replacement for backing up as such, but an insurance policy incase you're caught on the hop.

 

Go to each folder in turn, the ones I suggest are My Documents, Desktop (if you save stuff on there), My Music, My Pictures, My Videos (assuming you use these folders):-

Right click on each (in turn), and select Properties

Now click on the Location tab

Then select Move

Browse to you're slave drive\where you want it saved

Click Select

Then Apply

It will ask if you want to move all files over, say Yes (assuming you do), then OK

Job done, repeat with each folder to be moved, and then all you're work is on the slave drive without the worry if the OS drive crashes and needs reinstalling, enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't deny there are probably lots of such options available, BUT, they rely on the user using them after EVERY file change for maximum safety, what you suggest is more of a proper back up, and thats great, my method is for those who do not have the time, or discipline to use 3rd party options, neither does it rely on the back up being as good as the last back up, this method instantly saves to the slave drive, so worst case a reinstall is needed, the files are safe and retrievable after a reinstall, no worrying about when the last back up was, it is instant.

But for a proper back up you're method sounds ideal, and such methods should be used for proper backing up, my method is an interim safety net that is all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This works in both Windows 7 and Vista, the idea is simple, after working on a mates system where his raid failed, he had files that were essential (yeah we all know you should back up), but whether raid or single drive, if you have files in you're My Documents, My Music etc that you don't want to risk losing, then simply move these folders to a slave drive (needless to say you need 2 drives here), then if the worst happens, you do not have to worry about getting these files back, they are already safe on the slave drive, all work is automatically saved to the new location, NOT the OS drive, so if a reinstall is required, you're files are safe, this is not a replacement for backing up as such, but an insurance policy incase you're caught on the hop.

 

Go to each folder in turn, the ones I suggest are My Documents, Desktop (if you save stuff on there), My Music, My Pictures, My Videos (assuming you use these folders):-

Right click on each (in turn), and select Properties

Now click on the Location tab

Then select Move

Browse to you're slave drive\where you want it saved

Click Select

Then Apply

It will ask if you want to move all files over, say Yes (assuming you do), then OK

Job done, repeat with each folder to be moved, and then all you're work is on the slave drive without the worry if the OS drive crashes and needs reinstalling, enjoy.

 

So, explain to me how the slave drive is any safer or less likely to fail that the system drive?

 

You still relying on a single piece of hardware located in the same box as the other drive, connected to the same power source, etc. to maintaina single copy of your most important data. This only protects you from lossing files in the event of the system drive failing, but you are still just as vulnerable to drive failure.

 

There is no substitute for regular backups and the offsite backup options available today are inexpensive, secure, and have a very low system impact on modern PCs. Barring that a regular backup to an external drive that does nothing more than copy the files to another drive is still a better solution than just placing the files onto a different drive. There are tones of free utilities to do this or you can even look up how to use the xcopy command, create a batch file, and setup a schedule to run it every night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

move these folders to a slave drive ... then if the worst happens, you do not have to worry about getting these files back

Of course, "if the worst happens" applies to the slave drive, too.  If it fails, the files are lost ...

 

Nonetheless, it's a good strategy, if only because the system drive is much more likely to be harmed by malware.  Although an irreparably corrupted system drive is a disaster, it's certainly less catastrophic if your user data is safe on another drive.

 

For single-disk systems running one OS, I always create a boot drive, a system drive, and a data drive.  The first has only the support files necessary to boot the system, the second contains the Windows installation, and the third has separate folders for each user's documents, Internet temp files, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, "if the worst happens" applies to the slave drive, too.  If it fails, the files are lost ...

 

Nonetheless, it's a good strategy, if only because the system drive is much more likely to be harmed by malware.  Although an irreparably corrupted system drive is a disaster, it's certainly less catastrophic if your user data is safe on another drive.

 

For single-disk systems running one OS, I always create a boot drive, a system drive, and a data drive.  The first has only the support files necessary to boot the system, the second contains the Windows installation, and the third has separate folders for each user's documents, Internet temp files, etc.

 

I've never done this but I understand the concept and I've heard that it's a real pain because the OS by default wants to install everything to C:. Do you put the installed apps on 3 or 2? Would you explain how you do this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, explain to me how the slave drive is any safer or less likely to fail that the system drive?

Don't mistake this as being a replacement for a proper back up, I only suggest this as an insurance policy, of course a slave drive is just as likely to "fail" as the OS drive, BUT, the OS drive is far more likely to be rendered useless by an infection as said above, and this idea means that rather than backing up after every single change, you can leave it until it fit's with you're proper back up regime, but if the OS drive was corrupted, this saves you from losing everything added after the last back up from being lost as well, it's simply a safety net, not a replacement for proper back up's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never done this but I understand the concept and I've heard that it's a real pain because the OS by default wants to install everything to C:. Do you put the installed apps on 3 or 2? Would you explain how you do this?

Installing the OS on a drive other than C is easy, and the installer automatically places the boot files on C.  The OS doesn't "want" to install anything to the boot (C) drive; the system drive is the default.  The system drive therefore contains the Program Files folder, and it's very seldom necessary to manually select that drive during program installations, but you can choose to install nearly any program to the data drive (or elsewhere).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never done this but I understand the concept and I've heard that it's a real pain because the OS by default wants to install everything to C:. Do you put the installed apps on 3 or 2? Would you explain how you do this?

 

Installed apps are not data. TomGL is referring to having the system incuding apps in one place and all user data in another. There is an option in Vista and Windows 7 to move users data to another drive or partition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is where we might see advantages of blu-ray.

Blu-ray disks can hold entire operating systems and the disk media can be a reliable source for storage, Although the costs are still out of range for myself, I do see the prices dropping more and more on this type of medium.

 

Just another alternative to backup and storage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8210 guy has a good idea for someone using a computer that is either a newbie or not up to all this tech stuff.

dlsjr and tom and others correctly point out the problem of just storing your data on another partition of the main hard drive [there are plenty of free or low cost utilities to create new partitions] or even on a external hard drive.

and bob had a great idea for remote backup.

 

pull them all together, step by step to reduce headaches and worries.

1. purchase a 500GB or even 1TB external hard drive [$75-150] - let's call this EXTERNAL-A.

2. move all My Doc, My Videos, My Music so they are stored on the hard drive.

3. start storing all user created documents, videos, files, spreadsheets, PDF, downloads, etc. on the external drive.

4. purchase another 500GB or even 1TB external hard drive [$75-150] - let's call this EXTERNAL-B.

5. use a backup utility, file replicator, or folder synchronizer to "backup" the contents of EXTERNAL-A to EXTERNAL-B and optionally to a new folder on the main hard drive.

 

i have done all the above and essentially have three copies of my data - one each on EXT-A, EXT-B, and main hard drive..

when i go on vacation, i take EXTERNAL-B with me and put EXTERNAL-A in a fireproof safe in my house.

risk - there's a fire in my house or someone steals my computer and external hard drives. result = lots of weeping in my home over lost data.

 

to reduce that risk,

6. signup for a remote backup system, like bob suggested.

only risk there is that that company goes out of business and all your data is tossed.

 

 

for the file replicator, i use Karen's Replicator http://www.karenware...treplicator.asp (free, tho last update was in Nov 2009). very easy to use.

for the folder synchronizer, i use SyncBack Freeware V3.2.26.0 but the freebie version starts to nag you if you use it or copy more than some low threshold. i bought the SyncBackSE version for $30.

once i installed and setup the folders to synch, they work in the background so i rarely have to do a manual replicate/synch.

both do actual file copies and do not backup to a compressed or encrypted form. that's why i like them, cos i can take EXTERNAL-A or EXTERNAL-B with me, use the files, then sync when i get back home.

Edited by erperez54

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, "if the worst happens" applies to the slave drive, too.  If it fails, the files are lost ...

 

Nonetheless, it's a good strategy, if only because the system drive is much more likely to be harmed by malware.  Although an irreparably corrupted system drive is a disaster, it's certainly less catastrophic if your user data is safe on another drive.

 

For single-disk systems running one OS, I always create a boot drive, a system drive, and a data drive.  The first has only the support files necessary to boot the system, the second contains the Windows installation, and the third has separate folders for each user's documents, Internet temp files, etc.

 

Creating a boot drive separate to the system drive without it causing problems somewhere down the line sounds a bit too difficult to me! But I always keep all of my data on a separate partition, if only so that periodically I can do a clean install of my operating system on the system drive without it affecting my data files! As for backups, having lost some data once when a drive failed on me, I have been a bit of a belt and braces fiend ever since! Because I use Windows backup to backup all my data to a slave drive weekly, I synchronise all my data to an external drive daily and I backup all my data (automatically as it changes) to an online backup service! I also keep a second external drive at my daughter's house, which I swap over every time I visit, so that my data is synchonised on both drives in case one of them fails! LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...