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Jacee

Migrating to Windows 7 from Windows XP

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Running Windows Vista?

If you have Windows Vista, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. You can do a clean install (back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications) or an in -place upgrade (Windows 7 installs over Windows Vista).

 

Running Earlier Versions?

If you have Windows XP, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. But you must back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications. If you’re running Windows 2000, you’ll need to purchase the full product and do a clean install.

Please see this:

http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft/Windo...roduct/B0F9E641

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For the likes of me, I cannot figure out what all the hoopla is about with windows7. I was one of Microsoft's beta testers for windows7 and was not impressed with it. In fact, I found lots of problems with it and the operating system reminded me constantly that it was Vista with a new name and a new face. I'll stay with XP. It has no problems to speak of and is secure.

 

I read yesterday that Microsoft released 10 major updates for Windows7 due to some major flaws that caused it to crash. Imagine that...

 

Furthermore, why would I want to change from a dependable operating system to one that won't be around for more than a couple of years. Vista lasted maybe 2 years and Windows7 will last about 2 years and then Microsoft will decide it needs some more money so it will create another operating system by 2014 which is the final year of Windows XP support.

 

I've already advised my clients not to upgrade to windows7 let alone Vista. I've advised them to stay with XP since they're not having problems of any kind.

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For the likes of me, I cannot figure out what all the hoopla is about with windows7. I was one of Microsoft's beta testers for windows7 and was not impressed with it. In fact, I found lots of problems with it and the operating system reminded me constantly that it was Vista with a new name and a new face. I'll stay with XP. It has no problems to speak of and is secure.

 

I read yesterday that Microsoft released 10 major updates for Windows7 due to some major flaws that caused it to crash. Imagine that...

 

Furthermore, why would I want to change from a dependable operating system to one that won't be around for more than a couple of years. Vista lasted maybe 2 years and Windows7 will last about 2 years and then Microsoft will decide it needs some more money so it will create another operating system by 2014 which is the final year of Windows XP support.

 

I've already advised my clients not to upgrade to windows7 let alone Vista. I've advised them to stay with XP since they're not having problems of any kind.

 

I agree !

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@ rickk1

 

I Beta tested Windows 7 too .... I didn't have any problems with it. I had Vista Ultimate (no problems with it either) and did a clean install with both the Beta and RC1 versions. Now I have RTM 7600 Ultimate. (another clean install) :tup:

 

I'm sorry to hear that you had trouble and weren't impressed, but there are many of us who love this new OS!

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For the likes of me, I cannot figure out what all the hoopla is about with windows7. I was one of Microsoft's beta testers for windows7 and was not impressed with it. In fact, I found lots of problems with it and the operating system reminded me constantly that it was Vista with a new name and a new face. I'll stay with XP. It has no problems to speak of and is secure.

 

I read yesterday that Microsoft released 10 major updates for Windows7 due to some major flaws that caused it to crash. Imagine that...

 

Furthermore, why would I want to change from a dependable operating system to one that won't be around for more than a couple of years. Vista lasted maybe 2 years and Windows7 will last about 2 years and then Microsoft will decide it needs some more money so it will create another operating system by 2014 which is the final year of Windows XP support.

 

I've already advised my clients not to upgrade to windows7 let alone Vista. I've advised them to stay with XP since they're not having problems of any kind.

 

That's why they Beta test it. XP had it's issues as well when it was in Beta mode. I tried it and I ordered a copy because I actually like Windows 7. Can't please everyone so why bother.

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Can you do a clean install of Windows 7 with the Upgrade CD?

 

According to Microsoft, YES, you can do a clean install with the upgrade. That's why I ordered it when it was half price from MS. In fact, I'm doing a clean install and opting for the 64 bit configuration to go with my 64 bit AMD CPU.

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The entire point of releasing Beta and RC builds is to troubleshoot. Anyone who boycotts Windows 7 because of bad experiences with the beta is only hurting themselves.

 

I had some problems with Beta too, and less problems with RC builds (7100, 7264, 7600). Each new build was smoother than the previous. I'm now running Enterprise 64-bit version on several machines, and its sweet. Not a problem yet of any kind, and even have DOS-Box installed to run old Win 98 games. Haven't found an application/game yet that won't work with the 7600 build either straight away or under compatibility mode.

 

BTW, that's a nice upgrade walk through. Thanx! :-)

Edited by dark41

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The entire point of releasing Beta and RC builds is to troubleshoot. Anyone who boycotts Windows 7 because of bad experiences with the beta is only hurting themselves.

 

I had some problems with Beta too, and less problems with RC builds (7100, 7264, 7600). Each new build was smoother than the previous. I'm now running Enterprise 64-bit version on several machines, and its sweet. Not a problem yet of any kind, and even have DOS-Box installed to run old Win 98 games. Haven't found an application/game yet that won't work with the 7600 build either straight away or under compatibility mode.

 

BTW, that's a nice upgrade walk through. Thanx! :-

 

:) I tried W7 RC1 32 bit and had no difficulties outside of a minor problem with one of my favorite applications. I have ordered W7 Pro and I intend to clean-install the 64 bit version to a new SSD, then install and run my favorite apps in XP Mode.

 

For those who constantly belly-ache about Microsoft I suggest they invest in an Apple or get cozy with a version of Linux. Microsoft must be doing something right or 90% of the PCs in the world would be using something else.

:clap:

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:) I tried W7 RC1 32 bit and had no difficulties outside of a minor problem with one of my favorite applications. I have ordered W7 Pro and I intend to clean-install the 64 bit version to a new SSD, then install and run my favorite apps in XP Mode.

 

For those who constantly belly-ache about Microsoft I suggest they invest in an Apple or get cozy with a version of Linux. Microsoft must be doing something right or 90% of the PCs in the world would be using something else.

:clap:

 

Hardly. They have a monopoly in the business and an exclusive OEM market which allows them to put out mediocre products while still controlling the OS market.

 

That said, I was eligible for a free win7 upgrade. Maybe it will come, and if it does I'll probably use it but I'm not getting my hopes up.

Edited by adam22

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Hardly. They have a monopoly in the business and an exclusive OEM market which allows them to put out mediocre products while still controlling the OS market.

 

That said, I was eligible for a free win7 upgrade. Maybe it will come, and if it does I'll probably use it but I'm not getting my hopes up.

 

Totally agreed! I am a professional Windows developer and I HATE Vista. We do all of our software development on XP only (although later testing on Vista and now Windows 7 is the must).

 

From my somewhat cursory (development-wise) experience with Windows 7, I can attest that it looks and behaves pretty much like Vista. Microsoft and many reviewers claim that migration to Windows 7 won't have as many issues as people experienced with Vista. Well, that will be true if you're migrating from Vista to 7, BUT NOT for XP to 7.

 

So if you like Vista, Windows 7 is for you. If you have XP, especially with older hardware (video card, sound card, printers, scanners, etc.) I would STRONGLY recommend sticking with XP and not buy into the 7's flashy look. All those "new features" will be overshadowed by the headache of your hardware not working under 7, resulting in a much larger additional expense for the hardware upgrade.

 

Also the word of advice for people using any custom-built software and hardware under XP. (By that I mean any companies running a specialized software for their needs/equipment.) Before attempting to upgrade to Windows 7 (or Vista) consult with the manufacturers of that custom software/hardware. From my experience people went through a major headache by trying those news Operating Systems only to discover that their multi-thousand dollar equipment stopped working. SO BE WARNED.

 

The only way how I would advocate getting Windows 7 is on a new laptop, since it will come equipped with all the needed hardware so you won't be faced with a prospect of shoehorning your old hardware into Windows 7.

 

Last thing I want to say is that it amazes me that some online reviewers claim that now Microsoft came up with a new taskbar design in Windows 7 that can compete with the Dock in OS X. First of all, that in itself requires some adjusting for the loyal Windows users, and secondly, come on now, how many years did it take Microsoft to knock it off Apple's OS X?

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Totally agreed! I am a professional Windows developer and I HATE Vista. We do all of our software development on XP only (although later testing on Vista and now Windows 7 is the must).

 

From my somewhat cursory (development-wise) experience with Windows 7, I can attest that it looks and behaves pretty much like Vista. Microsoft and many reviewers claim that migration to Windows 7 won't have as many issues as people experienced with Vista. Well, that will be true if you're migrating from Vista to 7, BUT NOT for XP to 7.

 

So if you like Vista, Windows 7 is for you. If you have XP, especially with older hardware (video card, sound card, printers, scanners, etc.) I would STRONGLY recommend sticking with XP and not buy into the 7's flashy look. All those "new features" will be overshadowed by the headache of your hardware not working under 7, resulting in a much larger additional expense for the hardware upgrade.

 

Also the word of advice for people using any custom-built software and hardware under XP. (By that I mean any companies running a specialized software for their needs/equipment.) Before attempting to upgrade to Windows 7 (or Vista) consult with the manufacturers of that custom software/hardware. From my experience people went through a major headache by trying those news Operating Systems only to discover that their multi-thousand dollar equipment stopped working. SO BE WARNED.

 

The only way how I would advocate getting Windows 7 is on a new laptop, since it will come equipped with all the needed hardware so you won't be faced with a prospect of shoehorning your old hardware into Windows 7.

 

Last thing I want to say is that it amazes me that some online reviewers claim that now Microsoft came up with a new taskbar design in Windows 7 that can compete with the Dock in OS X. First of all, that in itself requires some adjusting for the loyal Windows users, and secondly, come on now, how many years did it take Microsoft to knock it off Apple's OS X?

 

 

I find that opinion and the qualifications for it to be total crap and misleading.

 

I couldn't care less who has a monopoly or who doesnt, but I care tremendously about what works and what doesn't work, and what suits the needs of my customers. MS OS's (with the exception of ME) have always been superior to anything Linux/Unix and Macintosh at the same period in time for running all hardware with all software while remaining user friendly, and that's why a huge majority of people use MS rather than some free open source alternative. Most people don't want to be hardware limited after going through the learning curve of a Mac, and by far most people appreciate the user friendliness of Windows over Unix/Windows.

 

Unlike you, my chosen profession requires that I know all Microsoft operating systems pretty well, and I do. I hate Vista too, but I'm quite happy with Win 7.

 

I run a custom computer business. We built over 1000 systems last year. Out of those, 7 had Vista on them because that's what this particular small business's plan required (latest components and software). Fortunately they'll also qualify for a Windows 7 upgrade soon, at a greatly reduced price (some will be free). Hardly anyone asked for Vista last year, and those who wanted my opinion were steered towards XP, with one major reason being that I knew Win 7 was on the horizon and would be a better alternative than Vista.

 

Every other system we built last year had Windows XP or a server OS on it.

 

I have 8 test systems set up with Win 7 on them. Every one of these systems has used everything from the Beta to the current RTM versions, both 32 and 64 bit. One is a 3.0GHz Pentium 4 with 2x512MB DDR memory, an Nvidia 5200 vid card, a SoundBlaster Live sound card, and an 8 year old Gigabyte motherboard. It runs very smoothly and has never had any hiccups. There were a couple driver problems with the Beta, but since RC build 7100 all drivers were found and installed without a problem.

Another system is an AMD socket 939 SLI, with a 1.8GHz AMD 3000+ CPU, 2x512MB DDR memory, SoundBlaster Audigy sound card, and ATI X600 video card. This system also performs very well with Win 7, had no problems finding or installing drivers, and benchmarks with almost identical scores to XP.

 

Win 7 has been tested extensively with E-computers with great results.

 

So contrary to what dc2000 says, Win 7 runs very well on older computer components and is in no way comparable to Vista in that regard.

 

That being said, I don't recommend users switch to Win 7 on older systems just for the sake of upgrading. When you need software that won't work on XP or do your next hardware upgrade, I recommend doing the Win 7 upgrade at that time as well.

 

Because we're custom, users will have a choice between XP, Vista, and Win 7 when Win 7 becomes available, and I'll gladly build whatever they want. However, if they ask my opinion I'll definitely push them towards Win 7 with a list of many good reasons why:

 

*Win 7 is much more secure than XP

*XP support will soon cease, and long before the computer hardware needs replacing

*More and more, users will find that software and hardware is not compatible with XP (there's already many hardware components and software that are not backwards compatible with XP)

 

*Win 7 has improved tremendously on the initial releases of Vista for stability and speed

*Win 7 is everything that Vista should have been, with the exception of the new file system that neither have

*Win 7 runs considerably better on lesser hardware than Vista (on mid-high end systems they perform pretty much identically)

*You'll be hard pressed to find a review that says either XP or Vista are better choices than Win 7 right now (so its not just my professional opinion that it is, and I have a very extensive list of reviews for my customers to read before making up their mind with accurate comparisions)

 

A person may look at Win 7 and think that its basically no different from Vista. It has many similarities. The differences are much too vast to list here. Google around and you can easily find many lists, most of which are incomplete.

 

The truth is that Win 7 is extremely different to Vista, although it will require basically the same learning curve to use from XP. Its still much less of a learning curve than switching to a Mac or Linux too. In my opinion, its well worth the learning curve. :-)

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Here's 1 example of an incomplete list of changes from Vista to Win 7:

 

•Windows Explorer in Windows 7 supports Libraries, virtual folders described in a .library-ms file that aggregates content from various locations - including shared folders on networked systems - and present them in a unified view. Searching in a library automatically federates the query to the remote systems, in addition to searching on the local system, so that files on the remote systems are also searched.

•The Quick Launch toolbar has been removed. The Windows 7 taskbar is more application-oriented than window-oriented, and therefore doesn't show window titles (these are instead shown when an icon is clicked if there are multiple windows, or hovered over). Applications can now be pinned to the taskbar allowing the user instant access to the applications they commonly use. There are a few ways to pin applications to the taskbar

•Aero Shake allows users to clear up any clutter on their screen by shaking (dragging back and forth) a window of their choice with the mouse. All other windows will minimize, while the window the user shook stays active on the screen.[9] When the window is shaken again, they are all restored, similar to desktop preview.

•The user interface for font management has been overhauled.[12] As with Windows Vista, the collection of installed fonts is shown in a Windows Explorer window, but fonts from the same font family appear as "stacks" instead of as individual icons. A user can then double-click on the font stack and see the individual font. A preview of the font is displayed as part of the icon as well. New options for hiding installed fonts are included; a hidden font remains installed, but is not enumerated when an application asks for a list of available fonts. Windows Vista had received considerable criticism for including the same "Add Font" dialog that had existed as far back as Windows NT 3.1; this dialog has been removed.

•Device Stage provides a centralized location for an externally-connected multi-function device to present its functionality to the user. When a device such as a portable music player is connected to the system, the device appears as an icon on the task bar, as well as in Windows Explorer.

•Support for color depths of 30-bit and 48-bit is included, along with the wide color gamut scRGB (which for HDMI 1.3 can be converted and output as xvYCC). The video modes supported in Windows 7 are 16-bit sRGB, 24-bit sRGB, 30-bit sRGB, 30-bit with extended color gamut sRGB, and 48-bit scRGB.[25][26] DPI settings in Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 are per-user, instead of per-machine as in prior versions of Windows. Additionally, DPI settings can be changed without a restart; a logoff/logon is sufficient

•* NDIS 6.20[29]

•* Native WWAN support, similar to native WiFi added in Vista.

•* VWiFi, that would allow a single wireless network adapter to act like two.[30]

•* AVCHD camera support and Universal Video Class 1.1

•* Protected Broadcast Driver Architecture (PBDA) for TV tuner cards

•* Support for up to 256 logical processors[31]

•* Fewer hardware locks and greater parallelism[32]

•* Timer coalescing: Modern processors and chipsets can transition to very low power usage levels while the CPU is idle. In order to reduce the number of times the CPU enters and exits idle states, Windows 7 introduces the concept of "timer coalescing"; multiple applications or device drivers which perform actions on a regular basis can be set to occur at once, instead of each action being performed on their own schedule. This facility is available in both kernel mode, via the KeSetCoalesableTimer API (which would be used in place of KeSetTimerEx), and in user mode with the SetWaitableTimerEx Windows API call (which replaces SetWaitableTimer).[33]

•* Multi-function devices and Device Containers: Prior to Windows 7, every device attached to the system is treated as a single functional end-point, known as a devnode, that has a set of capabilities and a "status". While this is appropriate for single-function devices (such as a keyboard or scanner), it does not accurately represent multi-function devices such as a combination printer/fax machine/scanner, or web-cams with a built-in microphone. In Windows 7, the drivers and status information for multi-function device can be grouped together as a single "Device Container", which is then presented to the user in the new "Devices and Printers" Control Panel as a single unit. This capability is provided by a new Plug and Play property, ContainerID, which is a Globally Unique Identifier that is different for every instance of a physical device. The Container ID can be embedded within the device itself by the manufacturer, or created by Windows and associated with each devnode, when it is connected to the computer for the first time. In order to ensure the uniqueness of the generated Container ID, Windows will attempt to use information unique to the device, such as a MAC address or USB serial number. Devices connected to the computer via USB (both directly, and indirectly via a USB hub), IEEE 1394 (FireWire), eSATA, PCI Express, Bluetooth, and Windows Rally's PnP-X support can make use of Device Containers.[34]

•* Windows Installer 5.0 supports installing and configuring Windows Services,[35] and provides developers with more control over setting permissions during software installation.[36] Neither of these features will be available for prior versions of Windows; custom actions to support these features will continue to be required for Windows Installer packages that need to implement these features.

•* User-Mode Scheduling: The 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 introduce a user-mode scheduling framework.[37] On Microsoft Windows operating systems, scheduling of threads inside a process is handled by the kernel. While for most applications this is sufficient, applications with large concurrent threading requirements, such as a database server, can benefit from having a thread scheduler in-process. This is because the kernel no longer needs to be involved in context switches between threads, and it obviates the need for a thread pool mechanism as threads can be created and destroyed much more quickly when no kernel context switches are required.

•* Windows 7 will also contain a new FireWire (IEEE 1394) stack that fully supports IEEE 1394b with S800, S1600 and S3200 data rates.[38] It will not initially ship with USB 3.0 support due to delays in the specification being finalized, but will support it with future patches from Windows Update.[39]

•* The "Trusted Installer" account is used to secure some of the core operating system registry keys in the same way that system files were first secured in Windows Vista. The keys have an access control list applied that prevents other users, including the system, from making changes.

•The Enterprise and Ultimate editions of Windows 7 incorporate support for the Virtual Hard Disk (VHD) file format. VHD files can be mounted as drives, created, and booted from, in the same way as WIM files.[41] Furthermore, an installed version of Windows 7 can be booted and run from a VHD drive, even on non-virtual hardware, thereby providing a new way to multi boot Windows. Some features such as hibernation are not available when booting from VHD.

•Windows 7 has also seen improvements to the Safely Remove Hardware menu, including the ability to eject just one camera card at the same time (from a single hub) and retain the ports for future use without reboot; and removable media is now also listed under its label, rather than just its drive letter like it was from Windows ME/2000 - Vista.[43] Also, Windows Explorer now (by default) only shows ports from a card reader in the My Computer menu which actually have a card present

•BitLocker brings encryption support to removable disks such as USB drives. Such devices can be protected by a passphrase, a recovery key, or be automatically unlocked on a computer

•Transcoding is integrated in the Windows Shell — the necessary conversion will happen automatically when a media file is dragged and dropped on the device icon.[citation needed] A new inbox video encoder will support encoding to H.264 1-pass CBR Baseline profile up to 1.5 Mbit/s, 640x480pixels at 30 frame/s. Audio encoder will support Low complexity AAC stereo at 44.1 or 48 kHz sample rate and 96, 128, 160 or 192 kbit/s bit rate.

•Windows 7 includes the new Windows Biometric Framework.[53] This framework consists of a set of components that standardizes the use of fingerprint biometric devices. In prior releases of Microsoft Windows, biometric hardware device manufacturers are required to provide a complete stack of software to support their device, including device drivers, software development kits, and support applications.

•A new User Account Control user interface has been introduced, which provides the ability to select four different levels of notifications.[50] Geo-tracking will also be available in Windows 7. The feature will be disabled by default. When enabled the user will only have limited control as to which applications can track their location.[51]

•Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 introduce support for Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC),[54] a set of specifications for securing certain kinds of information provided by the Domain Name System (DNS) as used on Internet Protocol (IP) networks. DNSSEC employs digital signatures to ensure the authenticity of DNS data received from a DNS server, which protect against DNS cache poisoning attacks.

•# DirectAccess, a VPN tunnel technology based on IPv6 and IPsec. DirectAccess requires domain-joined machines, Windows Server 2008 R2 on the DirectAccess server, at least Windows Server 2008 domain controllers and a PKI to issue authentication certificates.[56]

•# BranchCache, a branch-office cache system for files stored on central file servers. (c.f. Riverbed Technology)

•# AppLocker, a set of Group Policy settings built on Software Restriction Policies, to restrict which applications can run on a corporate network, including the ability to restrict based on the application's version number or publisher

.........

 

Hardly the same OS. ;-)

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dc2000, I still have my XP home computer ... I hardly ever use it anymore. It's relegated to my husband and kids :P

 

I had XP pro on my laptop, but I bought Vista Business and did a clean install on that machine. It's been very good to me ... nothing has gone wrong with it, even Beta testing SP2 and IE 8 did splendid!

 

You have to do your homework and see what will work for you as far as hardware, software and drivers go. I don't recommend putting a fresh coat of paint on a building that is going to be demolished in a couple of months.

 

Just in case you didn't know about *Windows XP Mode for Windows 7*, heres an article about it:

http://community.winsupersite.com/blogs/pa...-windows-7.aspx

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For the likes of me, I cannot figure out what all the hoopla is about with windows7. I was one of Microsoft's beta testers for windows7 and was not impressed with it. In fact, I found lots of problems with it and the operating system reminded me constantly that it was Vista with a new name and a new face. I'll stay with XP. It has no problems to speak of and is secure.

 

I read yesterday that Microsoft released 10 major updates for Windows7 due to some major flaws that caused it to crash. Imagine that...

 

Furthermore, why would I want to change from a dependable operating system to one that won't be around for more than a couple of years. Vista lasted maybe 2 years and Windows7 will last about 2 years and then Microsoft will decide it needs some more money so it will create another operating system by 2014 which is the final year of Windows XP support.

 

I've already advised my clients not to upgrade to windows7 let alone Vista. I've advised them to stay with XP since they're not having problems of any kind.

 

Who did MS release those 10 major updates for Windows7 too? Windows 7 Retail will not be available until Oct. 22. The release candidate is no longer available. I am one of those lucky enough to be a member of MSDNAA who already has the public release of Windows 7 Business. I have had no problems with 7. I relate it more to XP than Vista (which I dont care for). Its lean and fast like XP.

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When you're ready to move from XP to Windows7, this Walk through will be of tremendous help :)

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/ee150430.aspx

 

hi.is there a certain place i can find out exactly how to upgrade from my 32 bit windows xp to the 64 bit windows 7?i have a gateway 64x 4200 cpu which should be able to upgrade to the 64 bit system but i am not exactly sure how to do it.i do know i have to do a clean install.please help if you can.thank you.

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You can't upgrade XP to Windows 7 ..... you can however "migrate" as explained in the tutorial.

 

Even more, you can't upgrade from 32 bit to 64 bit; clean install only.

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Just to keep the facts straight, actually MS is selling what they call "upgrades" from XP to Win 7, and from Vista to Win 7. I have a couple sitting on the desk in front of me. They're slightly less expensive than buying a complete separate retail version, although both are still a clean install. They also void the old XP/Vista key. I'm pretty sure they can be used to go from 32-bit to 64-bit as well.

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...

I'm pretty sure they can be used to go from 32-bit to 64-bit as well.

 

I just did a 'custom' upgrade from 32-bit to 64, and the only problem I faced worked out very well.

 

A couple of months ago I was playing with a trial OS on my first sata build, and ran into trouble because I'd loaded it under a bios setting of IDE mode. My sata drives weren't working right, and KB922976 explained that I needed to make a registry change before I got the performance I expected from my new equipment.

 

To start, I needed to load my XP Home that I was going to upgrade to 7, and I didn't want to go attach a floppy for the sata drivers during the installation, so I was again forced to install under IDE Mode. The full setting on my Asus bios is >Advanced>Onboard Device Configuration>South OnChi PCI Device>Onboard SATA Type>. This very hidden setting is the only choice I've ever needed to play with for a problem besides very minor issues.

 

After I activated my XP Home, I went into the BIOS again, changed to the AHCI Controller (Advance Host Controller Interface) from the old IDE Mode, booted to the 64-bit 7 Upgrade disk, and it's been smooth sailing all week. I was nervous I'd have to make a change to a brand new registry, and mess up the 64-bit conversion.

 

BTW, the KB article doesn't go into nearly enough detail. You might not see an actual error message, but just have trouble reading a CD/DVD, or just notice your HDD is moving too slow when you go to SATA. Make the change to your registry and then the BIOS and you'll never look back.

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BTW, the KB article doesn't go into nearly enough detail. You might not see an actual error message, but just have trouble reading a CD/DVD, or just notice your HDD is moving too slow when you go to SATA. Make the change to your registry and then the BIOS and you'll never look back.

Nice tip mateek :)

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Thanks everyone for your input. I had XP 32 bit and thought I was following instructions well to do a clean install with the upgrade 64 bit disc. The install went without any problems and when it was all said and done my old data was already there! All I had to do was install the applications. I still wonder if I made a mistake because I didn't expect my data to be there automatically. I had backed up my data to an external HDD but only had to use a small portion of it to restore anything. I am also pleasantly surprised how well Windows 7 ran with only 2 gigs of ram! No problems at all for two weeks, now I have 6 gigs of ram. I'm happy with Windows 7. :tup:

Edited by newtech

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I belief that the new o.s. 7 has still children's disease, but about 2 - 4 years later, Windows7 is than a fine program.

For example: Xp came in year 2000, the o.s. Xp had many errors in his program, many years later, people love Xp.

About couple years, we love than o.s.7.

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

Edited by Man Of The Future

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