Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
faith_michele

Privacy and Social Networks

Recommended Posts

I was interested in discussing the topic of "Privacy and Social Networks."

 

The Economics of Privacy in Social Networks

 

by Joseph Bonneau, Sören Preibusch, LightBlue Touchpaper Blog, June 26th, 2009

 

We collected a lot of data, and there was a little bit of something for everybody. There was encouraging news for fans of globalisation, as we found the social networking concept popular across many cultures and languages, with the most popular sites being available in over 40 languages. There was an interesting finding from a business perspective that photo-sharing may be the killer application for social networks, as this features was promoted far more often than sharing videos, blogging, or playing games. Unfortunately the news was mostly negative from a privacy standpoint. We found some predictable but still surprising problems. Too much unnecessary data is collected by most sites, 90% requiring a full-name and DOB. Security practices are dreadful: no sites employed phishing countermeasures, and 80% of sites failed to protect password entry using TLS. Privacy policies were obfuscated and confusing, and almost half failed basic accessibility tests. Privacy controls were confusing and overwhelming, and profiles were almost universally left open by default.

http://www.lightbluetouchpaper.org/2009/06...ocial-networks/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey faith,

I see there haven't been any post to this yet so I'll play devils advocate.

 

Why would you be social networking if you expect privacy? Doesn't the whole concept of networking exclude privacy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey faith,

I see there haven't been any post to this yet so I'll play devils advocate.

 

Why would you be social networking if you expect privacy? Doesn't the whole concept of networking exclude privacy?

 

Thanks for playing devils advocate. You are right. It seems that privacy concerns keep people from sharing more - especially when they know that their information would be disclosed. The marketing side of social networking sites want you to disclose the information.

 

This is an exerpt from a Bruce Schneier Blog Post, July 16, 2009, Privacy Salience and Social Networking Sites. It referenced the Cambridge University study from my previous post.

 

But their most interesting finding was that sites consistently hide any mentions of privacy. Their splash pages talk about connecting with friends, meeting new people, sharing pictures: the benefits of disclosing personal data.

 

These sites do talk about privacy, but only on hard-to-find privacy policy pages. There, the sites give strong reassurances about their privacy controls and the safety of data members choose to disclose on the site. There, the sites display third-party privacy seals and other icons designed to assuage any fears members have.

 

It's the Carnegie Mellon experimental result in the real world. Users care about privacy, but don't really think about it day to day. The social networking sites don't want to remind users about privacy, even if they talk about it positively, because any reminder will result in users remembering their privacy fears and becoming more cautious about sharing personal data. But the sites also need to reassure those "privacy fundamentalists" for whom privacy is always salient, so they have very strong pro-privacy rhetoric for those who take the time to search them out. The two different marketing messages are for two different audiences.

 

Social networking sites are improving their privacy controls as a result of public pressure. At the same time, there is a counterbalancing business pressure to decrease privacy; watch what's going on right now on Facebook, for example. Naively, we should expect companies to make their privacy policies clear to allow customers to make an informed choice. But the marketing need to reduce privacy salience will frustrate market solutions to improve privacy; sites would much rather obfuscate the issue than compete on it as a feature.

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2009...cy_salienc.html

 

I just think you have to use common sense when engaging in social network sites. An example is that if I start seeing scams or get weird direct messages (that begin with thanks for the follow) on Twitter, I will not follow that person anymore. Also, my settings are in locked mode so I have to approve each follower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is more related to employees, but there are some good general tips provided. The podcast is worth listening to.

 

Hidden Privacy & Security Risks of Web 2.0

 

by Rebecca Herold on August 10, 2009

 

There's been a lot in the news lately about "Web 2.0" security and privacy problems. A lot of folks, though, don't know what that term really means. Do your personnel know what it means? Probably not. This is certainly understandable since Web 2.0 really is a reference to many different things. The common link is that Web 2.0 represents what is considered to be the "second generation" of Internet activities and tools...

 

Your personnel are using Web 2.0 sites while they are at work whether you know it or not. Be sure to provide them with training and give them ongoing awareness communications to make sure they don't leak out your business, customer and employee information while the are tweeting, blogging, on Facebook, using Sharepoint, or using any numbers of other types of Web 2.0 sites.

http://www.realtime-itcompliance.com/infor...urity_risks.htm

 

Podcast - http://www.privacyguidance.com/piq72009/Q3...tionPodcast.mp3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

faith this is a tough one' but so that i can keep my information private' it never get's broadcast, at least the legitimate data.

 

plain and simple' everyone is a target.

 

edit: those networks that are more secure are' most vulnerable.

Edited by duanester

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, I agree. :)

 

Although, it doesn't change the fact that many people are using this technology without understanding what could be used against them. I just think that more awareness of the risks should be discussed in order for them to make informed decisions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not hard to create a msn email address then use it purely for social networks, I did the same for face book, i dont use that email add for any other purpose than fb, i dont ever check that account for emails either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, I agree. :)

 

Although, it doesn't change the fact that many people are using this technology without understanding what could be used against them. I just think that more awareness of the risks should be discussed in order for them to make informed decisions.

 

yes but first i would devise a plan and create a website, the website would contain a stripped of nonsense privacy information for various sites "because millions do not read" if they did then of course they would fight back.

 

also must consider translating the legal garble into plain english without infringing on any copyright material.

 

if you create such' many will come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...