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cmunson

Windows - Planned Obsolescence

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most peeps don't know or care enough clean up their pc's....they just want to drive and not do any maintance....ignorance is bliss

 

 

If it was written properly, you shouldn't have to clean it up. If you un-install a program, it should be totally removed. No trace of it should be left on your computer, whether it's the folder it was installed in, any files in that folder, or any entries in the registry. It should all be removed. Temporary files should be deleted when a computer is shut down / restarted or when a program is no longer being executed. It should do this automatically. In my opinion, it's sloppiness that the OS doesn't do this by default.

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I emailed this article to a friend who swears by XP. I'll have to be dragged kicking and screaming from my win98se as if that tells you anything about how i like to change os's ;)

 

This was his reply to the article. Thought it was interesting. Replies to his response are welcome.

 

 

"Yes, Windows has a feature called "Windows Restore". No. this feature does not steal 12% of your hardrive space - unless you ask it to. This feature includes a neat little feature called System Settings in which you can allocate the amount of harddrive space you wish to use from almost 0% to a maximum of 12%. In my case, I have a 180GB drive C. I can allocate from as little as 200MB at 0% to as much as 20306MB at 12% in the following increments, 1-2-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11 & 12%. I can also choose to place my "Windows Restore" files on an alternative drive if I want more or, "and get this, I can turn the damn thing off and do no "Windows Restore" at all. All one has to do is read the instructions when they familiarize themselves with their operating system when first upgrading to a new system. DUH!

While I do not have Windows Vista and just have lowly Windows XP Home, I'm sure vista allows you to turn this feature off if you want to go back to Windows ME or earlier built on safety. Personally, I've used the restore point feature several times in the 4 + years I've had XP and it has been well worth the disk space I've used up.

 

As far as defragmentation is concerned, how often does one really need to defrag? This can very but I venture to say that once every six months or so is more than enough for the average user. As with most routines, you have to get the hell out of them and then go back into them to get an update. If this guy is reporting on Vista and Vista gives no defrag report, where the hell is he getting the one he's showing. It sure doesn't look anything like the report I get on XP and that particular routine does update relatively accurately when completed. It also gives you an approximation of what your end results will be BEFORE you start the defrag process.

 

I'm sure there are things to :filtered: about with the new Vista programming as well as bugs that will have to be worked out. That's why I always wait 6 mo. to a year before I jump in with a new upgrade.

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You're right about that, most folks don't know and M$ isn't in any hurry to tell you either, Users have to find out for themselves. I don't have the book that comes with the retail copy of XP so I can't say for sure if they provide you with that info, But I do know that OEM manufacture's (compaq, dell, gateway...ect.) don't mention it to their new owners!!

 

it does tell you..12% of hard drive space

perhaps no one did the math on how much 12% is. however you can lower it.

i used nlite which allows higher/lower or removed completely before install.

 

f it was written properly, you shouldn't have to clean it up. If you un-install a program, it should be totally removed. No trace of it should be left on your computer, whether it's the folder it was installed in, any files in that folder, or any entries in the registry. It should all be removed. Temporary files should be deleted when a computer is shut down / restarted or when a program is no longer being executed. It should do this automatically. In my opinion, it's sloppiness that the OS doesn't do this by default.

dont blame the OS for that, there are 3rd party programs that do completely remove themsevles, many dont, thats not microsofts fault, its included unistaller only works as well as the apps unistaller allows. also never expect a shareware prog to be removed completely...how else can they tell if you already ran the trial before?

 

temporary files can be deleted when a computer is restarted...not by default, you can edit the registry and most tweak apps allow that, however there are times when temps are needed.

 

alternativly if you want a prestine os with each reboot, i found deepfreeze to work perfectly after moving the documents folder and other things that require constant change to a thawed partition

 

wenger6, i agree to the article

some things arent the easiest to change in xp or vista...but every single little thing can be altered removed or enhanced to your liking for those who learn.

i also have yet to see the performance benchmarks proving benefit from defragging more often than once every 8-12 months on well used machines, ntfs works pretty well

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Thank you for the article; very informative and shocking.

 

I tried to follow the instructions for how to restrict how big the restore points will be and to delete any unnecessary ones; no matter what "unhide" setting I've dealt with, I still have Systen Volume Information still Hidden. Its confusing the heck out of me. Is there somewhere else I have to go to get access to this folder? I'm talking XP Home, obviously. There's no way I'm upgrading to Vista.

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Hi Wenger6,

 

Thanks for sending my article to your friend. Here's my response to him and others reading.

 

First off, I made a very bad choice of words. Windows XP is not "stealing" space from your hard drive. It is allocating up to 12% of your hard drive, and as your friend notes, you can unallocate the space. That said, I think that it is flawed that your restore allocation is a % of your hard drive. It should be a fixed amount. Let's say 2GB. As we all know, hard drives get bigger every year, and therefore your allocation is growing.

 

But worse yet, your friend should know that unlike XP, there is no way to change the setting in Vista. It has been increased from 12% to 15% and no way to change it. In this sense, Vista is truly stealing the space of your hard drive, since most users have no way of recovering the space.

 

On the age old question "How often should one defragment?". There is no easy answer. If your hard drive is full, and you regularly are writing big files, or using email and IE6 of lower, then you should probably defrag every day. If your computer is relatively new, and you have a lot of free space, then you can get by with once a month. Vista comes out of the box defragmenting your drive once a week.

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It can be done Rob, but I seriously doubt most people will be doing it.

 

http://vistasupport.mvps.org/decrease_stor...tem_restore.htm

 

 

Those directions are ridiculous, as Bruce pointed out. Bet there will be a tweak/utility program soon that takes care of that (are you listening, Rob?).

 

:)

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We are currently analyzing how to update our products so that people can recover their hard drive space. For sure, we see the opportunity. But I have to ask the question, WHY?

 

1. Why would they hide the registry setting?

2. Also, the hidden registry setting is still a percentage of the hard drive. This logic has been flawed since Windows XP. It should be a function of how many days that you want to go back. It makes no sense that the larger your hard drive, the more restore points you require.

 

I'm already working on my next article, but there is another wrinkle. Another huge change in Vista that bears more investigation. Stay tuned.

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We are currently analyzing how to update our products so that people can recover their hard drive space. For sure, we see the opportunity. But I have to ask the question, WHY?

 

From Microsoft's perspective, why not? Most users don't know they have a choice, don't realise that it is taking up drive space, probably don't know what a hard drive is.

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drives are becoming huge and cheap, a 300gb like mine is now $70 after $20 mail in rebate :) 500 and 700+ will be soon common options at local stores which is rediculous imo anyway

 

with vista and 3 games,dreamscene videos, backup and restore, an image of C: and whatever system restore is using i'm 238 gb's free, just sittn there doing nothing.

 

seems some just like to have something to complain about

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seems some just like to have something to complain about

 

Some prefer to use the nice new hardware for the data of their choosing.

 

Some like to control what their computer does, and how it does it.

 

Some don't want 30 or 40+ gigabytes to just disappear without them knowing how to recover it easily.

 

Some prefer not swallow the hook line and sinker.

 

Some choose not be sheep.

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Some prefer to use the nice new hardware for the data of their choosing.

users can find a plethora of information about system restore and how to turn it off or 3rd pary options.

 

Some like to control what their computer does, and how it does it.

whats stopping them? the option that says turn off system restore or the information that tells you what percentage of drive its useing? if its neglect to become aware then of course that can apply to pretty much anything in life but if that some like to control..then they must learn first huh.

 

Some don't want 30 or 40+ gigabytes to just disappear without them knowing how to recover it easily.

if you mean system restore, the simple disk cleanup mentions its option to remove previous restore points. there is nothing there that reasons and excuse for user neglect when learning how to do something on their computer, meaning their complaining over their neglect to read help and support/a manual or google on the internet, like any OS, the options are there, you just have to learn about it first.

 

Some prefer not swallow the hook line and sinker.

what product thats advertised does that not include exactly?

 

Some choose not be sheep.

sheep for what? default options? system restore is on by default so people dont alternativly complain about it not being on and how they had to reformat due to a bad driver. size so they can find at least one good point that works the way they want.

 

so you briefed me about excuses for complaints but i dont see what the answer should have been which is what?

make system restore use 1% or .5% space so that you have xxx.xxx.xxx amount of users over 5 years find they have 1 or 2 restore pionts both of which are unable to restore to those points for various reasons? sometimes there are several out of a dozen that wont restore...ah, now you have a whole new complaint dept. instead of this particular one

 

non of which was meant to sound negative in any way rather just proof once more that no one can please everyone.

 

and does the idea of a bigger hard drive not apply to the same logic for upgrading ram?

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