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mrlessk

Intel P4 1.6GHz Processor...

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Hi,

Dell DIM4400

Windows XP Home SP2

1.60GHz Pent4/768RAM

BOINC 5.4.11

SAH & EAH

DSL

 

I've started running multiple BOINC Projects, and will have my computer available for it's distributed computing projects and I'd like opinions on crunching multiple projects...where CPU Usage (as seen at the bottom of the Task Manager) will show a constant 100%...24/7.

 

From looking around the net, there seems to be some debate on the feasibility of running a computer with an Intel P4 1.6GHz Processor at 100% CPU Usage 24/7 and whether or not this can be harmful to the Processor and I'd like opinions from you knowledgeable folks here at Pitstop.

 

Belarc Advisor specs:

1.60 GHz Intel Pentium 4

Board: Intel Corporation D845PT AAA67834-303

Serial Number: MY01K529124651CN03LU

Bus Clock: 100 megahertz

BIOS: Intel Corp. A02 12/12/2001

**with no special custom modifications to the Dell 4400,

relying strictly on the stock Fan/Cooling that comes with it.

 

Could there be any problem doing this?

If there is the possibility of any damage to the Processor, I'll just back off on the User Preferences to incorporate starting/stopping of the crunching allowing the Processor to return to around 3% and then back to 100% when BOINC kicks in again.

 

Thanks,

 

Telstar :)

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Thanks for your comments so far everyone Posted Image

 

The reality is that I will NOT be doing any mods to this computer.

 

I do understand what you're saying that by adding more cooling power (fan/speed fan), this can keep the temperature of the CPU lower...but, I don't fall into the category of anyone having customization skills that can take on such a challenge.

 

My question then would be more along the line of:

 

"Can an out of box computer such as a Dell DIM4400, having an Intel P4 1.6 GHz Processor, be capable of running 24/7 at 100% CPU Usage without degrading, damaging or in any way affecting the life-span of the Processor?" Posted Image

 

Thank again,

 

Telstar

 

Posted Image

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Running 24/7 full load is going to reduce the lifespan of any cpu, but that cpu should still last around 3 years minimum. That cpu should be long gone by now anyway so it's no harm even if it does kill it.

Edited by bigchrome

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I read somewhere yesterday (Tom's Hardware, I think) that the life expectancy of a CPU is around 10 years. I would think that when they come up with that number, it's from using the CPU.

 

I would be more worried about the hard drive or CPU fan failing before the CPU, especially if the computer is running at stock.

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It's not going to hurt your computer to run at 100% 24/7. The key will be temperatures. If the temps are staying at a good level then you are fine. Set it up. Let it run. Monitor the temps. Just be sure your not blocking the air flow with anything and check to see that the fans aren't being blocked by lint and dust. Let that thing do what it's made to do.

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Put a small fan in front of it then.

 

Install Speedfan or another motherboard temp/diagnostic program to monitor it. Then you can see what it does.

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okay well i believe that you can run whatever computer you want 24/7 at full load......as long as it isnt full of dust :P ....even the simplest of folk can open up one of those dell dimensions and clean it out......they open like a book. i have the dimension 4550 downstairs and have done plenty of crap to it.

 

and about the cpu dying thing, ive never had one die on me. except for that time i killed an amd k6-III 450mhz by setting the jumpers the wrong way (on purpose, i was trying to get higher speeds from a 66mhz fsb board with only upto 3x multi....and i put them every which way with a p1 mmx233mhz and it never blew) and at one particular way, it never turned on again, and now it just heats up like a stove top any time i try it in any board lol.

 

so you deff. dont have to worry about cpu's dying, unless you like ran them without ANY heatsink or fan haha. then ud likely see them die in a matter of minutes :P

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Like people have said, a computer running at stock speeds, especially something like a dell which has been tested it should be fine, but since it is pretty old it has to have collected some dust, just clear out any dust that is on the cpu heat sink or any intake/exhaust fans then you shouldn't run into any problems with it.

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Hey everyone, thanks much for all your input. :)

 

Based on the general consensus that I see here, it's pretty obvious that cooling is the key to prolonging the life of the (any) CPU...

and also that "stock" fans that come with the Computer (like my Dell 4400) may not be sufficient enough when the user pushes the CPU to run 24/7 at full Load:

 

"don't think it would be a problem as long as it has proper cooling."

"Temps are king."

"Wouldnt hurt to upgrade/add fans..."

"you need to have super cooling if you want to run 24/7."

"It's not going to hurt your computer to run at 100% 24/7. The key will be temperatures."

"Running 24/7 full load is going to reduce the lifespan of any cpu, but that cpu should still last around 3 years minimum."

Considering that my computer is already almost 5 years old (with NO hardware issues so far...knock on formica), I now realize I might be asking for trouble by running it at 100% Load 24/7.

"okay well i believe that you can run whatever computer you want 24/7 at full load......as long as it isnt full of dust...dont have to worry about cpu's dying, unless you like ran them without ANY heatsink or fan haha."

Actually, the computer sits in a relatively clean environment, although dust in the air WILL make it's way inside any computer...last year, being concerned about this, I got myself a can of air, opened up the case and did a thorough preventive maintenance cleaning by blowing out any dust from inside and around the fans...

 

Bottom line: I've decided to listen to your cautions and back off on running this thing at 100% Load 24/7. Though my computer is active 24/7, I've adjusted my Preferences in the BOINC manager to reduce crunching to those times when I am NOT using the comp (computer is idle) and also to use only 75% of computer resources when it is crunching those Projects.

 

Thanks again all,

 

Telstar :adios:

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If we had a baseline full load temp... we could say if its too hot or cool enough :D

 

What do I need to do to get this reading?

 

Speedfan? (as mentioned earlier)

Haven't installed this yet.

 

Telstar :)

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Ok, I'm intrigued with being able to learn a little more about the goings on inside my computer...

 

To this end, I've downloaded and installed:

 

SpeedFan 4.31

SpeedFan Temperature Monitor 4.0

 

I'm reading through the Help file, but am very hesitant Posted Image about doing anything to/with the Program that might make permanent, harmful changes to my computer.

 

Anyone familiar with these Programs want to guide me through the setup and what I need to do in order to post results here that can be analyzed?

Of course, I'm not interested in making changes to anything...just monitoring.

 

Thanks,

 

Telstar :)

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It's pretty simple. All it does is reads the existing temp and fan monitors already on your motherboard. A lot of the times you'll see the temps and fans speeds in your bios. Speedfan just reads those same sensors. You might like Everest better to just monitor and not adjust.

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You might like Everest better to just monitor and not adjust.

Lavalys leaves freeware development

Press Release | 2005-12-05

"Lavalys announced today that it leaves the freeware market by halting the development of its EVEREST Home Edition (the successor of AIDA32) system diagnosis product."

source

uh oh...looks like I'd have to pay $30 for it...I'd rather stick with Freeware...but thanks for the suggestion, it does look like it would be best suited for a system monitoring novice like myself.

 

Telstar :)

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Thanks for the info and link...

I've uninstalled SpeedFan for now, and have installed Everest 2.20.

 

While Everest seems to be thorough in it's system information, benchmarking and diagnostics, it looks like I won't be able to glean information regarding Fan speed, voltage or temp values based on this from the FAQ:

 

14. Is it possible to detect temperatures, voltage values and fan status of Dell computers?

Dell computers use a proprietary sensor chip that is undocumented and so cannot be supported by EVEREST.

 

I'd be glad to produce a report on any other aspect that might be useful for anyone willing to take a look at it to determine my computer's status and it's ability to withstand (or not) the rigors of running at 100% CPU Usage for 24/7.

 

Looks like SpeedFan might have been able to do this, but quite frankly, I found it a bit confusing as to how to correctly set it up on my computer...mainly the instructions were unclear plus the fear of doing anything with SpeedFan that might result in some kind of permanent change that might prove counterproductive since it does immediately associate itself with my computer hardware, motherboard and controls.

 

Of course, as with anything, once you learn to use it properly, it's then pretty safe and easy to use.

 

Here's my latest TechExpress if anyone wants to take a look...any comments or suggestions appreciated.

 

http://www.pcpitstop.com/techexpress.asp?id=NMLVPWPNSWJS3C3J

 

Thanks,

 

Telstar :)

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Your fears of speedfan are not unfounded, infact I know all to well how badly it can :filtered: a pc! Set the pc folding 100% and leave it for a day, if it still works then you're ok. If you are still worried though take off the heatsink, clean it, apply new thermal compound and put it back on. Check the case has proper ventiliation and you're set.

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