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Replacing an HDD 3.5" USB 3.0 Enclosure


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#1 sanguillen

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:37 AM

Hello,

 

For the last few days, my Seagate srd00f2 3.5" 3 tb hard drive would not show up on either my work laptop or my work laptop when I plugged it in (its light would not come on when plugged in).  In searching the Internet, the problem seemed to be the enclosure of the hard drive, so I went out and purchased an Orico 3.5" 3.0 USB enclosure (3588C3), removed the hard drive from the Seagate enclosure, and installed it in the new one.  It powers up fine now, and both laptops recognized it and installed it.  But when I try to access the hard drive on either laptop, I now get the message "D:\ is not accessible.  The volume does not contain a recognized file system.  Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and that the volume is not corrupted".  When I go into Disk Management, I see what is in the image below (RAW file system instead of NTFS, and with partitions that are "unallocated".  The "unallocated" is actually data that I need to access - this is not a new drive.

 

I've no idea what to do to be able to access the information on here, and would greatly appreciate any assistance you might be able to lend.  Thanks!

 

"The volume does note contain a recognized file system":

http://i.imgur.com/jmsyv67.jpg

 

Disk Management

http://i.imgur.com/X4lswPH.jpg



#2 caintry_boy

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 11:17 AM

Try using DiskDigger to recover any files on the old drive that you want to save and save them to something that you CAN access. You can get DiskDigger here > https://diskdigger.org/diskdigger.zip
Download, install and run the DEEP SCAN.

Be sure to save your data, pictures, etc. to a USB drive or cd/dvd or another external drive.

 

 

 

 

:geezer:


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#3 nigsy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:27 AM

I might suggest a different way...

 

Try running a live Linux CD (This allows you to run Linux without installing it) on the laptop and see whether Linux can see the files. It's a little less fussy about file systems than windows.

 

If not then yep anything like DiskDigger or my fav Photorec: (Sorry can't link to site as work firewall blocks me!!)

 

https://www.google.c...chrome&ie=UTF-8

 

Either way as soon as you get them off back up, back up and back up again!!


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#4 sanguillen

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 07:01 AM

Thank you both for your replies!

 

@caintry_boy - the only option I had was "Dig Deeper", as the "Dig Deep" option was grayed out.  It's a slow process as it is a 3 TB hard drive that is almost full, so it's running at roughly 1% per hour (and of course, at some point overnight Windows ran an AutoUpdate that involved a reboot, so I had to start again first thing this morning!   :facepalm:  :glare: ).  It does seem to be finding the files though though interestingly, some of the filenames are preserved, but others are referred to as "mkv at Sector X", or something similar.  Question while it is still running - I takes it chkdsk is not an option to run....at least not until I've backed up the files?

 

@nigsy - I Googled the live Linux CD options, but am unclear as to how to run any of these without installing it.  I'm presuming it's not as easy as just putting the .exe file on a USB and running that file off of that?  I got a little confused when reading the types (such as Knoppix), and my understanding of Linux is almost 0....

 

I've got a new drive ready for backup as soon as I can access these files, but what do you both think of the situation so far?  Do you think it might be a simple file system repair, or something more serious like early signs of an HDD failure?


Edited by sanguillen, 09 August 2017 - 07:02 AM.


#5 nigsy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 10:05 AM

 

 

@nigsy - I Googled the live Linux CD options, but am unclear as to how to run any of these without installing it.  I'm presuming it's not as easy as just putting the .exe file on a USB and running that file off of that?  I got a little confused when reading the types (such as Knoppix), and my understanding of Linux is almost 0....

 

I've got a new drive ready for backup as soon as I can access these files, but what do you both think of the situation so far?  Do you think it might be a simple file system repair, or something more serious like early signs of an HDD failure?

 

To run a Live cd you will need to download a Linux .iso (I would just go for Ubuntu); either burn it to a disk or create a bootable USB stick (if your BIOS can boot from USB). Best tool for creating a bootable USB is a little bit of software called Rufus.

When you run the .iso it will give you the option to install or run as a Live CD - Just choose the latter and you're away.

 

The trouble with any software recovery tool is that large files that are stored across multiple sectors don't tend to recover very well as you no longer have a working index. It's ok for photo and word docs; but music and video not so good. Even then the files names might be altered.

 

As for 'file system repair' or just a reformat - I'm sure Seagate have a diagnostic tool you can run to tell you the condition of the drive. Just need to Google it.

Don't run any reformat options until you have exhausted all suggestions as you will loose everything!!

 

Hope this helps.


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#6 sanguillen

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 12:30 PM

 

To run a Live cd you will need to download a Linux .iso (I would just go for Ubuntu); either burn it to a disk or create a bootable USB stick (if your BIOS can boot from USB). Best tool for creating a bootable USB is a little bit of software called Rufus.

When you run the .iso it will give you the option to install or run as a Live CD - Just choose the latter and you're away.

 

The trouble with any software recovery tool is that large files that are stored across multiple sectors don't tend to recover very well as you no longer have a working index. It's ok for photo and word docs; but music and video not so good. Even then the files names might be altered.

 

As for 'file system repair' or just a reformat - I'm sure Seagate have a diagnostic tool you can run to tell you the condition of the drive. Just need to Google it.

Don't run any reformat options until you have exhausted all suggestions as you will loose everything!!

 

Hope this helps.

 

Thanks nigsy.  I'm currently at work so without being able to access my laptop, how would I know if my BIOS can boot from USB?  My laptop is about 5 years old, so I don't recall the specs on it (though I do know that Windows 7 is the normal OS on it)



#7 caintry_boy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 06:13 PM

I'd stay away from chkdsk while recovering files. ;)

 

 

 

 

:geezer:


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#8 sanguillen

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 10:07 PM

I'd stay away from chkdsk while recovering files. ;)

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

 

I'll take your word on that.  :)

 

I tried Ubuntu, and it's not picking up the drive at all - so I'm back to continuing my DiskDigger scan.  :erm:



#9 nigsy

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 01:37 AM

 

I'll take your word on that.  :)

 

I tried Ubuntu, and it's not picking up the drive at all - so I'm back to continuing my DiskDigger scan.  :erm:

 

You probably need to mount it; you'll need Gparted (For Ubuntu):

 

press Ctrl - Alt and T (this should open a terminal window);

 

Type the following in:

sudo apt-get install gparted

and let it install

 

Should be able to run it by typing sudo gparted into the terminal window. (it needs root privileges to run).

 

Let us know how you get on with disc digger.

 

Might also be worth running Photorec after disc digger to see if it finds anything else.


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#10 sanguillen

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 06:44 AM

 

You probably need to mount it; you'll need Gparted (For Ubuntu):

 

press Ctrl - Alt and T (this should open a terminal window);

 

Type the following in:

sudo apt-get install gparted

and let it install

 

Should be able to run it by typing sudo gparted into the terminal window. (it needs root privileges to run).

 

Let us know how you get on with disc digger.

 

Might also be worth running Photorec after disc digger to see if it finds anything else.

 

Regarding Gparted - so I would do all of that whilst running Ubuntu?  Ironically, Ubuntu was having an issue with the new portable drive I just purchased to use as a backup/replacement for this one - it would recognize it, but not allow access for some reason (don't recall exactly what the message said).  Windows 7 had no issues with it when I plugged it in, so I was a little surprised when Ubuntu had a problem with it.  Ubuntu did recognize a flash drive I have just fine, so this has all been rather perplexing.

 

As for Photorec, yes I will run that after DiskDigger.  DiskDigger is running faster now that I have it plugged into my USB 3.0 port, so I anticipate it will be done by the time I get home from work today.



#11 nigsy

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 07:26 AM

 

Regarding Gparted - so I would do all of that whilst running Ubuntu?  Ironically, Ubuntu was having an issue with the new portable drive I just purchased to use as a backup/replacement for this one - it would recognize it, but not allow access for some reason (don't recall exactly what the message said).  Windows 7 had no issues with it when I plugged it in, so I was a little surprised when Ubuntu had a problem with it.  Ubuntu did recognize a flash drive I have just fine, so this has all been rather perplexing.

 

As for Photorec, yes I will run that after DiskDigger.  DiskDigger is running faster now that I have it plugged into my USB 3.0 port, so I anticipate it will be done by the time I get home from work today.

 

It's about permissions in Linux; the new drive worked in windows because you don't need root access for the drive to be mounted a massive security hole! Depending on the mounting point in Linux you need to be in the root user group to mount it. You can then change the permissions etc later.

 

Good luck with the recovery. I've had similar issues in the past; guess you learn to back everything up!!

 

And yep; Gparted in Ubuntu


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#12 JustinP526

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 07:18 PM

Maybe try Ultimate Boot CD?
I've used it many times. It has so many useful utilities and runs from a Gentoo Linux with gparted already available to use.

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#13 caintry_boy

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 01:07 PM

Try using DiskDigger to recover any files on the old drive that you want to save and save them to something that you CAN access. You can get DiskDigger here > https://diskdigger.org/diskdigger.zip
Download, install and run the DEEP SCAN.

Be sure to save your data, pictures, etc. to a USB drive or cd/dvd or another external drive.

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

 

This'll work even if you have to let it run overnight. Just be sure to have space available to save your files too. Some may have funky file names, but I think after you save them to USB or hdd that you can rename them. (don't quote me on that!)

 

 

 

 

:geezer:


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#14 terry1966

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 05:16 PM

once you have backed up your files using whatever software and chkdsk doesn't fix the problem then i'd suggest trying to fix the hard drive using photorecs companion software testdisk.

step by step guide. :- http://www.cgsecurit...sk_Step_By_Step

 

with luck this will fix the corrupted partition/file tables and you will now have the drive back exactly how it was in the old enclosure but now in the new enclosure with all your files still on it and readable.

 

:b33r:


Edited by terry1966, 11 August 2017 - 05:22 PM.


#15 sanguillen

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:17 AM

 

It's about permissions in Linux; the new drive worked in windows because you don't need root access for the drive to be mounted a massive security hole! Depending on the mounting point in Linux you need to be in the root user group to mount it. You can then change the permissions etc later.

 

Good luck with the recovery. I've had similar issues in the past; guess you learn to back everything up!!

 

And yep; Gparted in Ubuntu

 

That's good to know about the permissions - thanks.  Unfortunately, I'm guessing that this explanation doesn't apply to the HDD with the issues?

 

 

Maybe try Ultimate Boot CD?
I've used it many times. It has so many useful utilities and runs from a Gentoo Linux with gparted already available to use.

 

Thanks for the tip, Justin.  If I get back to trying Ubuntu again (see below), I will look this program up!

 

 

 

This'll work even if you have to let it run overnight. Just be sure to have space available to save your files too. Some may have funky file names, but I think after you save them to USB or hdd that you can rename them. (don't quote me on that!)

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

 

It actually took 2-3 days to run, but a lot of that was my fault as I had set the drive up on a regular USB port, leaving the USB 3.0 port open for the new drive so that any files I'm able to save would write faster.  I obviously got a little ahead of myself so I saved my session and shifted it over to the 3.0, where it moved much quicker.  I am now at the stage of moving stuff to the new drive, which is taking longer.  The music files, for the most part, seems to have preserved their file names.  The movies and TV shows, however, are pretty much all named "Y file at sector xxxxxxxxx", so I'll have quite the renaming project ahead of me (though that won't be nearly as painful as trying it would have been trying to replace all that stuff!).  It seems as though I'm able to rename the files in Windows Explorer, so that's good.  :-)

 

 

once you have backed up your files using whatever software and chkdsk doesn't fix the problem then i'd suggest trying to fix the hard drive using photorecs companion software testdisk.

step by step guide. :- http://www.cgsecurit...sk_Step_By_Step

 

with luck this will fix the corrupted partition/file tables and you will now have the drive back exactly how it was in the old enclosure but now in the new enclosure with all your files still on it and readable.

 

:b33r:

 

Thanks, Terry.  That was going to be my next question, once the transfers are all complete (probably another couple of days, as I will leave it running while I'm away for the weekend).  Which software should I run first on the HDD in question?



#16 sanguillen

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:18 PM

Actually, the transfers from the saved DiskDigger files are complete.  Based on the amount of space used up on the new drive, it looks like all data was saved!  Although it seems mp4 files get converted to mpeg extensions instead, and there is heavy fragmentation, such that many of these extensions don't work at their current state.  I just ran SeaTools, and the Short Drive Self TestGiven passed (it curiously does not give me an option for running Long Drive Self Test).

 

Given this info, does it make sense to proceed with chkdsk, or should I use something else first instead?  :unsure:



#17 terry1966

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:26 PM

on a windows system chkdsk is always the first and easiest thing to run, and if it can't fix the problem then move onto other software.

 

:b33r:

 

forgot to say the seatools long test may not show up because it also see's the drive as raw and unformatted. which with luck you'll be able to fix either by running chkdsk or testdisk which i have used at least once to fix the exact same issue you're having where a hd showed as raw without losing anything on it, was a long time ago but if memory serves all i had to do was repair the boot sector from it's backup. http://www.cgsecurit...sector_recovery


Edited by terry1966, 12 August 2017 - 01:42 PM.


#18 sanguillen

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 04:22 PM

Chkdsk is a no go - in Windows 7, I get the message "the disk check could not be performed because the disk is not formatted".  WHen I try to run it from the cmd prompt, I get "The type of the file system is RAW.  CHKDSK is not available for RAW drives".

 

I'm moving on to TestDisk....



#19 sanguillen

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Posted Yesterday, 02:27 PM

on a windows system chkdsk is always the first and easiest thing to run, and if it can't fix the problem then move onto other software.

 

:b33r:

 

forgot to say the seatools long test may not show up because it also see's the drive as raw and unformatted. which with luck you'll be able to fix either by running chkdsk or testdisk which i have used at least once to fix the exact same issue you're having where a hd showed as raw without losing anything on it, was a long time ago but if memory serves all i had to do was repair the boot sector from it's backup. http://www.cgsecurit...sector_recovery

 

TestDisk hasn't gone so well.  I'll be able to post more info later today, but what do I do if it says that boot sector and backup are both bad?



#20 sanguillen

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Posted Yesterday, 06:20 PM

Here is what I'm seeing in TestDisk:

 

 

FcuoRPJ.jpg?1

 

FdPms0B.jpg?1

 

sPn4VP5.jpg?1

 

At this point, I'm not sure how to best proceed?






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