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Does Restoring to a previous restore point remove Virus or Malware?

Restore Virus Malware Drive Vaccine Deep Freeze

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#1 AlexG

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:58 AM

Hey, I am new to this forum and like to stick around to learn more about various aspect in technology. However my first question and not the last one is my curiosity on restore softwares like Deep Freeze or Drive Vaccine. My question lies whether when a restore takes place does it remove the Virus or Malware from the system. Keep in mind, the restore point is in the same system as of the restore software. Any information will be great. Cheers

#2 Dakeyras

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:12 AM

Hi and welcome to PCPitstop. :)

My question lies whether when a restore takes place does it remove the Virus or Malware from the system. Keep in mind, the restore point is in the same system as of the restore software.


It would all depend on what type of malware as even a System Restore point can become infected/compromised. In that instance a Malware Removal process would be prudent after invoking such(if successful) and upon conclusion create a new safe clean System Restore point and then in turn flush the older ones.

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#3 AlexG

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:43 AM

Thank you for the welcome. Is there a way to protect the restore points from most types of malware thus decreasing the probability of the restore point getting effected. Because for a restore point to get effected, it would make recovering the system quite a hassle as well as making a new system restore after the damage is done is quite pointless. So I would like to know if there is a way to have restore points protected atleast from most types of malware that might damage a restore point and a system. Much appreciated.Cheers

#4 Dakeyras

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

Thank you for the welcome.


You're welcome! :)

Is there a way to protect the restore points from most types of malware thus decreasing the probability of the restore point getting effected. Because for a restore point to get effected, it would make recovering the system quite a hassle as well as making a new system restore after the damage is done is quite pointless. So I would like to know if there is a way to have restore points protected atleast from most types of malware that might damage a restore point and a system.


The only viable way I am aware of would be to observe safety online/what any one machine is used for. Below is some generic advice about such...

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Install all critical updates and relevant service packs via Windows Update. For XP the latest is SP3, Vista is SP2 and Windows 7 is SP1.

I would also ensure Internet Explorer is up-to date. For XP based machines it is IE8, Vista it is IE9 and Windows 7 is IE9. Reason being even if you opt not to use IE as your main browser having a out of date version installed can leave any one machine vulnerable to malware.

The aforementioned should be available via Windows Update.

Once a machine is updated and fully patched, I do advise visiting Windows Update periodically as Microsoft releases patches for Windows and other products regularly.

Plus check Automatic Updates is enabled.

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Install a Anti-Virus software solution, only ever have one of such installed and active in system memory at any one time.

Either of the below will suffice:-
Which ever of the above you choose to install, automatically checks for updates and downloads/installs them with every system reboot and or periodically if the machine is left running providing a internet connection is active.

I advise you also run a complete scan with this at least once per week.

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Installing a specific Anti-Spyware application would be prudent, myself I recommend:-

Malwarebyte's Anti-Malware

During the installation process you will be offered the Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware Trial. Your choice to enable or not...

After installing, I advise check for updates and run a scan at least once per week.

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Emergency Recovery Utility NT. I advice you consider installing this, as a means to keep a complete backup of your registry and restore it when needed. Instructions can be read here.

Myself I would actually create a new back up once per week as this along with System Restore may prove to be invaluable if something unforeseen occurs!

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Never open email attachments, not even if they are from someone you know. If you need to open them, scan them with your antivirus program before opening.
Never open emails from unknown senders.
Beware of emails that warn about viruses that are spreading, especially those from antivirus vendors. These email addresses can be easily spoofed. Check the antivirus vendor websites to be sure.
Be careful of what you download. Only download files from known sources. Also, avoid cracked programs. If you need a particular program that costs too much for you, try finding free alternatives on Sourceforge or Pricelessware.

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Windows by default allow scripts (which is VBScript and Javascript) to run and some of these scripts are malicious. Use Noscript by Symantec or Script Defender by AnalogX to handle these scripts.

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P2P may be a great way to get lots of seemingly freeware, but it is a great way to get infected as well. There's no way to tell if the file being shared is infected. Worse still, some worms spread via P2P networks, infecting you as well. My advice is avoid these types of software applications.

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A custom Host-File is a further layer of protection whilst browsing online. Basically a Hosts file is like a phone book. You look up someone's name in the phone book before calling him/her. Similarly, your computer will look up the website's IP address before you can view the website.

Hosts file will replace your current Hosts file with another one containing well-known advertisement sites, spyware sites and other bad sites. This new Hosts file will protect you by re-directing these bad sites to 127.0.0.1.

Either of the below will suffice:-
Only use one of the above!

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Consider installing WinPatrol. This application alerts you about possible system hijacks, malware attacks and critical changes made to your computer without your permission.

Download it from here.

You can find information about how WinPatrol works here.

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Finally, periodically visit the Secunia Online Software Inspector to ensure all third party software is upto date. As many such as Adobe and Java related applications for example if out of date can be exploited by malware.

Or alternately download/install and use FileHippo Update Checker...

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