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Turn on Computer With No Case


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#1 el kido

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 09:20 PM

Im sure most of us know this trick since it was maybe one of the only ways to do an outside case test. But since motherboards now have onboard power and reset buttons, we have forgotten our old ways. Here is a quick update to refresh you old timers. :whistling:

All you Need is 3 things. The computer you are experimenting/working on with no case, a screw driver and a monitor of course.

Posted Image Posted Image


Once you have your work station sitting there nice and ready, locate the Front Panel pins. Usually looks like this.

Posted Image

Locate where it says +PW-. Now get your Screw driver ready to start the PC. You can stick it inbetween the 2 pins or ontop of the pins. In between works better since it wont accidentally touch the other pins and it just is lol.

Now Touch! Posted Image

Within a second the PC should start up. Thats all you needed to do. The Metal works the same as the button on the front of the case.

Now to restart, its the same thing, find +Res- and then tap it on those two pins. To shut down hold the screwdriver between +PW- for a few seconds to shut off.



Thought I would share since its so easy and doesnt require any aftermarket tool really. :beerchug:

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#2 Joe C

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:46 AM

I find it much easier to find an old case and steal the cable with the push button on it that starts the pc, better than using a screw driver and making any mistakes by shorting out the wrong pins (opps!). You can find old cases almost anywhere from garage sales to behind pc shops that throw them away., here's a pic of the cable and I find it invaluable when doing dianostics or testing new boards before I put them in a case during a build

Posted Image

#3 Bear

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 08:49 PM

Both ideas are great, just be sure if you use the wire suggestion that the switch on the end is a momentary switch and not a pole switch ( One that stay's on) Bear
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#4 ShadowBlack

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 12:00 PM

what I would like to know and I hope this isn't to much off topic. How can you power on a power supply without a motherboard 20and 24 pin . I want to use the supply to hook up several fans and create a cooling system.

#5 el kido

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 01:53 PM

It is possible. you can follow this nice little guide I found. LINK

But Why? Fans dont draw even that much power. Or are you using it for something other then a computer?

CPU---------------Intel I7 2600k @ 4.4ghz daily Case--------------Xigmatek Elysium HD----------------G. Skill Nuetron GTX 240gb SSD GPU--------------Nvidia GTX 680 PSU---------------Corsair TX750
Motherboard-----EVGA P67 FTW RAM--------------8GB G. Skill Ripjaw X DDR3 @ 2133 Cooling----------EK Supreme HF, MCR320, MCP355 with top.


#6 TomGL2

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 06:15 PM

How can you power on a power supply without a motherboard 20and 24 pin .
I want to use the supply to hook up several fans and create a cooling system.

This can be a problem.† Many ATX and newer power supplies will not turn on without a sufficient load such as at least a hard disk.

I wouldn't bother using a computer PS to drive just a few fans; a 12VDC AC adapter ("wall wart") is more reliable and far cheaper.

#7 bobs626

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 11:34 PM

It is possible. you can follow this nice little guide I found. LINK

But Why? Fans dont draw even that much power. Or are you using it for something other then a computer?

I use an old emachine power supply to run a small 12 v scanner and it has worked fine for the past few years. Most power supplies just need the GREEN and BLACK wires on the 20/24 pin plug jumped to get it to fire up. Great way to test them when you donít have a board to check with.... hope this helps :tup:

#8 Iancito

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 05:03 AM

OK, let me catch my breath and try to reply to this thread without banging my head against the keyboard. :pullhair: I've worked for many years in production on hi-tech products (since the original 8086 based PC) so have some insight into the kind of practices that go-on behind the scenes to make sure your computer, motherboard, memory etc reaches you in perfect working-order. If I saw a circuit being treated this way prior to delivery to a customer I would scrap it - it is ruined (I'd also fire the individual responsible). Looking at the test-rig in these pictures makes me want to cry - this thread should come with a "KIDS, DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME" warning. The sophisticated components in modern electronic equipment are extremely vulnerable to a number of failure mechanisms. The prime destructive mechanism is ESD (Electro-Static-Discharge) which is a very real problem, not taking ESD precautions at all times when handling circuit boards and components will cause the kind of damage that is responsible for all those niggley little problems/crashes/etc that you cant quite explain that may only manifest themselves when your PC is under-pressure or on a hot day - but are really annoying. In a production facility we have special coatings on floors, wear special conductive shoes and clothing, all benches are earthed, so is the equipment we use, and wrist-straps are worn at every workstation. Having followed these precautions throughout the process, when a product passes final test we put it into its anti-static packaging and protective box without delay so that it reaches the customer in perfect condition. On the test-rig in the pictures; in addition to the massive ESD risk there's also the risk - as you are powering-up a badly mounted board - of electrical shorting. Similar problems to ESD but maybe a more immediate/instant manifestation. Heat is also an issue. A well designed PC case ensures a good and continuous airflow by virtue of the position of the vents and fan. The 'out-of case PC' runs the risk of localised overheating of some components. The best thing you can do with a motherboard, graphics card, memory card etc is to install it correctly into the case/slot and leave it there. In doing so you should observe all the relevant ESD precautions ensuring that both you and the PC are earthed. Wrist straps and earth-leads are cheap compared to the cost of a new PC. When you buy a new card it comes in ESD/protective packaging - do not remove this until you have earthed the PC and yourself and are ready to install. When you do open the package handle the card without touching any of the components and mount it in the PC immediately - do not rest it on any other surface and do not rest it on the outside of the packaging/bag it came in (that's where all the static lives that was prevented from getting to the card in shipping). Ensure that you maintain ESD protection until all connections are made and all covers and panels are fitted to the case, only then start-up the PC. Final two points: 1 - If you don't understand how to take ESD precautions - never open your PC case and never handle an electronic circuit. 2 - Just because you CAN do something does not mean that you SHOULD. Iancito

#9 got the flavor

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 05:55 AM

OK, let me catch my breath and try to reply to this thread without banging my head against the keyboard.

:pullhair:

I've worked for many years in production on hi-tech products (since the original 8086 based PC) so have some insight into the kind of practices that go-on behind the scenes to make sure your computer, motherboard, memory etc reaches you in perfect working-order. If I saw a circuit being treated this way prior to delivery to a customer I would scrap it - it is ruined (I'd also fire the individual responsible).

Looking at the test-rig in these pictures makes me want to cry - this thread should come with a "KIDS, DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME" warning.

The sophisticated components in modern electronic equipment are extremely vulnerable to a number of failure mechanisms. The prime destructive mechanism is ESD (Electro-Static-Discharge) which is a very real problem, not taking ESD precautions at all times when handling circuit boards and components will cause the kind of damage that is responsible for all those niggley little problems/crashes/etc that you cant quite explain that may only manifest themselves when your PC is under-pressure or on a hot day - but are really annoying.

In a production facility we have special coatings on floors, wear special conductive shoes and clothing, all benches are earthed, so is the equipment we use, and wrist-straps are worn at every workstation. Having followed these precautions throughout the process, when a product passes final test we put it into its anti-static packaging and protective box without delay so that it reaches the customer in perfect condition.

On the test-rig in the pictures; in addition to the massive ESD risk there's also the risk - as you are powering-up a badly mounted board - of electrical shorting. Similar problems to ESD but maybe a more immediate/instant manifestation.

Heat is also an issue. A well designed PC case ensures a good and continuous airflow by virtue of the position of the vents and fan. The 'out-of case PC' runs the risk of localised overheating of some components.

The best thing you can do with a motherboard, graphics card, memory card etc is to install it correctly into the case/slot and leave it there. In doing so you should observe all the relevant ESD precautions ensuring that both you and the PC are earthed. Wrist straps and earth-leads are cheap compared to the cost of a new PC.

When you buy a new card it comes in ESD/protective packaging - do not remove this until you have earthed the PC and yourself and are ready to install. When you do open the package handle the card without touching any of the components and mount it in the PC immediately - do not rest it on any other surface and do not rest it on the outside of the packaging/bag it came in (that's where all the static lives that was prevented from getting to the card in shipping). Ensure that you maintain ESD protection until all connections are made and all covers and panels are fitted to the case, only then start-up the PC.

Final two points:

1 - If you don't understand how to take ESD precautions - never open your PC case and never handle an electronic circuit.

2 - Just because you CAN do something does not mean that you SHOULD.

Iancito


Come on thats a bit over the top, Ive run many machines outside the case and NEVER had any static discharge probs, the real old machines where very sensative to static but not the new ones, Yes i agree a very high static discharge may fry components but if my machine got hit by lightening i would expect it never to work again.

#10 Joe C

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 11:51 AM

Iancito does have some good advise about ESD,say an IC chip is rated for 5 volts, you touch the chip by fooling around in your pc and you have 300 volts ESD, your not going to feel 300 v ESD when you touch that IC chip but the chip will get damaged. Taking the extremes recommended is a bit much IMHO, but properly grounding yourself and using a wrist strap should be practiced It takes 1000's of ESD volts when you rub your feet across the carpet and get a jolt from the door handle and you'll feel that. Your not going to feel several hunderd volts, but your pc will

#11 el kido

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 01:07 PM

Whattt? I was runnning on carpet, petting my dog and eating a bag of chips when I was doing this, how is that not safe! :P Sometimes being to precautios is a bad thing. If you use common sense there are no issues there.

CPU---------------Intel I7 2600k @ 4.4ghz daily Case--------------Xigmatek Elysium HD----------------G. Skill Nuetron GTX 240gb SSD GPU--------------Nvidia GTX 680 PSU---------------Corsair TX750
Motherboard-----EVGA P67 FTW RAM--------------8GB G. Skill Ripjaw X DDR3 @ 2133 Cooling----------EK Supreme HF, MCR320, MCP355 with top.


#12 TomGL2

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 04:20 AM

...open the package handle the card without touching any of the components ... do not rest it on the outside of the packaging/bag it came in (that's where all the static lives that was prevented from getting to the card in shipping)

Iancito, I think that you do not understand the nature of the protective packaging used for sensitive electronics.† Static electrical charges are generated only by nonconductive materials and accumulate on conductors; electrical discharge occurs between two conductors.

"Antistatic" bags are of two general types.† They can (1) contain additives that prevent a static charge from forming, or can (2) contain conductive materials, such as carbon fiber, that makes the material a very poor conductor or, conversely, a not quite perfect insulator (about 100 M/sq in).

In the first case (truly antistatic materials), no static charge can develop on the inside or ouside of the bag.† The contained device will have little or no charge (whatever it had when packaged, less losses due to humidity).

In the second case (conductive materials), any static discharge to or from the bag occurs very slowly and has too ittle intensity to harm the component, even though the charge will have been distributed through the bag and its contents.

Although a grounded system and repair station appears the ideal scenario, this is not the case.† The assumption that grounding the equipment gives it a potential of zero volts is incorrect. "Ground" can easily be hundreds of volts positive or negative (or considerably more) due to weather conditions, for example.† Charge separation occurs in clouds (hence lightning); if the lower cloud surface is positively charged, the adjacent earth becomes negative, and vice versa.† Another factor is that the power grid's neutral is tied into the local ground, and the vagaries of power distribution can offset neutral by dozens of volts, which alters the ground voltage in the vicinity.

Assuming a workstation with a non-zero potential (regardless of grounding), the conductive bag provides more effective protection.† Once in contact with a local ground, the potential of the bag and its contents is the same as the workstation.

The antistatic bag, however, is an insulator, and cannot equalize charges.† High humidity will do the job, though, provided enough time is allowed.† The upshot is that even components handled with what appears to be perfect ESD precautions can still be damaged when it is assumed that grounding and the use of antistatic bags is sufficient.

My method of dealing with this problem is simple.† Immediately before installing a part, I open its bag and slide the part into a conductive bag, then touch this bag to a metal part of the system chassis.† In my kit I keep a motherboard-sized bag for this purpose.

Two other items.† Technicians working offsite very seldom use ground straps or bracelets, relying instead on good contact discipline (bare forearms is often ehough).† It is quite safe to rest a PCI board or other component on an antistatic or conductive bag, but never lay them on bare metal.

#13 got the flavor

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 07:32 AM

Just a little note to add NEVER sit your mb on the antistatic bags with the black lines running thru them, they are conductive and will cause a short.

#14 el kido

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 12:10 PM

Just a little note to add NEVER sit your mb on the antistatic bags with the black lines running thru them, they are conductive and will cause a short.


have a bad experience? :lol:

CPU---------------Intel I7 2600k @ 4.4ghz daily Case--------------Xigmatek Elysium HD----------------G. Skill Nuetron GTX 240gb SSD GPU--------------Nvidia GTX 680 PSU---------------Corsair TX750
Motherboard-----EVGA P67 FTW RAM--------------8GB G. Skill Ripjaw X DDR3 @ 2133 Cooling----------EK Supreme HF, MCR320, MCP355 with top.


#15 got the flavor

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 05:04 PM

have a bad experience? :lol:


You could say that was having all sorts of errors and no clue as to why, i cant remember what made me relise waht the problem was as it was a long time ago but i was lucky and after the bag was removed it worked fine.

Another thing to add is that most boards these days come with a protective coat of lacquer all over them so i dont think static is much of a prob these days.




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